Category: E-Commerce

Port of Stockton operations not crimped by COVID-19 pandemic

Central Valley Business Times

March 19, 2020

  • Operations modified where needed
  • “The Port of Stockton’s ability to support our business partners has not been impacted”

California’s largest inland seaport, the Port of Stockton, is open and operating normally, officials say, although some measures are in place to prevent the spread of the virus that causes the COVID-19 illness.

“The Port of Stockton’s priority is to ensure the health and safety of all Port stakeholders; to date, the Port of Stockton’s ability to support our business partners has not been impacted by COVID-19,” says Port Director Richard Aschieris. “With our quickly changing environment, we remain vigilant and engaged with private sector stakeholders as well as local, state and federal agencies to ensure we have the latest information available and are operating per their guidance and implementing the most effective measures to support our shared goal of keeping all Port users, partners and staff safe while maintaining business continuity.”

He says the seaport has implemented a variety of measures to protect and limit contact and exposure of COVID-19 to Port employees as well to reduce the risk of a disruption to the services provided to our customers and tenants, including:

  • Reduced domestic travel to only that which is critical for the Port’s business continuity
  • Encouraged telephone or video conferencing for internal and external meetings
  • Implemented mandatory wearing of Personal Protective Equipment for staff performing essential operations and maintenance functions requiring external in-person contact
  • Implemented strategic physical separation of Port staff functions at various sites within the Port premises
  • Encouraged preventive actions recommended by the Center for Disease Control

“We will continue to monitor and respond to the changing needs created by this pandemic, ” Mr. Aschieris says.

The Port’s police department remains open 24 hours a day and its maritime and real estate departments continue to operate during normal business hours.

Updates to the Port’s status will be posted as needed to the Port’s website www.portofstockton.com (COVID-19 stands for “coronavirus disease 2019, ” a respiratory illness caused by a virus named SARS-CoV-2. SARS stands for “severe acute respiratory syndrome,” a disease first identified in Asia in 2003.)

https://files.constantcontact.com/2cb20f61601/2f931797-fd73-4394-b999-f3037480f26c.pdf

Amazon, Save Mart hiring in Patterson, Modesto amid coronavirus pandemic. Apply here.

Amazon plans to hire 800 workers for its Patterson and Tracy warehouses, a spokesperson said Tuesday, to help meet increased demand during the coronavirus pandemic.

The temporary jobs are among the 100,000 nationwide openings Amazon announced Monday, the same day Modesto-based Save Mart Cos. said it expects to hire nearly 1,000 employees in California and Nevada.

Save Mart Cos. had posted at least 26 job openings in Stanislaus County grocery stores as of Tuesday afternoon, according to searches on the Save Mart careers page. More than half of the openings are clerks and grocery baggers at Modesto Save Mart and FodMaxx locations.

Meanwhile, the combined 800 openings at the Amazon fulfillment centers in Patterson and Tracy will be posted at the online retailer’s website. Current employees at both locations will a $2 per hour raise, an Amazon spokesperson said, bringing wages for delivery people and warehouse workers to $17 per hour. Some of the new temporary jobs will be full-time, while others will be part-time.

“We also know many people have been economically impacted as jobs in areas like hospitality, restaurants, and travel are lost or furloughed as part of this crisis,” the online retailer said in a news release. “We want those people to know we welcome them on our teams until things return to normal and their past employer is able to bring them back.”

Other companies that announced plans to hire new workers during the coronavirus pandemic include Raley’s and Safeway, a subsidiary of Albertson’s. The Sacramento-based chain Raley’s is looking for personal shoppers and intends to fill positions within a week or less, according to its job postings. The Raley’s at Village One Plaza in Modesto is among those looking for an “eCart team member,” a search showed.

Safeway said Monday it has 2,000 immediate openings for delivery drivers and store workers across Northern California, Hawaii and Nevada. Stores are accepting applications online or in person, a news release said.

https://www.modbee.com/news/coronavirus/article241275246.html?

Valley fans crave cookies, company expands

FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) — Massive chocolate chip and churro cookies are baking all afternoon long at Crave Cookie’s new kitchen.

“With the demand, we were able to keep hiring drivers, keep adding more zip codes. We moved to a bigger, more centralized kitchen in a better area for delivery zones, and we’re able to keep going.,” said co-owner Shandi Scrivner.

Crave gave Action News a sneak peek inside their recent expansion as they try to keep up with customer demand.

The company receives orders online and delivers them fresh to your door.

Just last month, they partnered with coffee shop Kuppa Joy to sell their sweet treats.

“Right now we’re delivering them everyday fresh at 3 pm. The cookies are hot fresh until they sell out,” Scrivner said. “They usually last an hour or two. We’re working with them to get more cookies more available and more often.”

Crave is one of the few companies in the Valley operating a food business without a storefront or food truck.

It’s a concept known as a ghost kitchen, which are mainly popular in larger cities.

“With minimum wage going up, cost of product, cost of restaurant , we’re able to keep the overhead low and keep our business flourishing,” Scrivner said.

Scrivner says she and her husband are trying to be smart about their growth and expansions.

In 2019, they started their delivery business from Clovis with a homemade cookie recipe.

“There’s really no secret, just really good cookies delivered hot and convenient,” Scrivner said.

It’s one that people have been craving more.

There are two permanent flavors and the owners say more seasonal flavors will be available around the holidays.

The owners of Crave Cookie have even more plans for the future. They’re looking Into adding a second kitchen space to serve more customers living in Fresno and beyond.

Fresno County is rated No. 1 in the nation in agricultural production

 

It’s begun. That shaking is the sight and sound of almond harvest in the Sacramento Valley. Almonds are one of the state’s biggest crops. This video is from Jim Morris at a Yolo County farm. 

The agricultural championship has returned to Fresno County.

For the first time since 2013, Fresno County leads the nation in agricultural production.

Producing nearly $7.9 billion worth of agriculture in 2018, Fresno County edged out Kern County ($7.47 billion) for the coveted crown.

“According to the California Department of Food and Agriculture, ‘Over a third of the country’s vegetables and two-thirds of the country’s fruits and nuts are grown in California.’ ” Fresno County Farm Bureau CEO Ryan Jacobsen said in a statement. “Fresno County lies in the heart of this production and proudly serves as the food capital of the nation.”

Tulare County rated third at $7.21 billion in agricultural production.

Farmers and ranchers in Fresno County produced a record value of $7.88 billion in crops and commodities last year, up from $7.02 billion in 2017.

Almond production led the charge, producing a value of $1.18 billion.

Grapes were Fresno County’s second most valuable commodity at $1.11 billion, followed by pistachios ($862 million), poultry ($596 million) and garlic ($435 million).

Melissa Cregan, the Fresno County agricultural commission, said the county’s strength stems from the diversity in crop production. The county had more than 300 different crops in 2018, of which 76 grossed at least $1 million.

“Although individual commodities may experience difficulties from year-to-year,” Cregan wrote in her letter to the Fresno County Board of Supervisors, “Fresno County continues to supply the highest quality of food and fiber nationwide and abroad to more than 95 countries around the world.”

Business landscape looks bright for Shafter

January 9, 2020 | View PDF

Courtesy Wonderful Company

The Walmart distribution center is scheduled to open in the fall of 2020.

The City of Shafter has been enjoying a reputation of being one of the fastest growing cities in business in recent years, attracting such companies as Target, Ross and several other big retailers.

The most recent addition is Walmart, which is scheduled to open the most technologically advanced distribution center in the nation in Shafter in the fall of 2020.

Bob Meadows, business development director for the city, says Shafter is a sought-after destination for businesses, large and small.

“We have several irons in the fire. This year should see the city continue to build on this success and make 2020 a special one.”

Financially, the city has been touted as one of the most financially sound cities in the state. Meadows said that since he joined the city last year, he has become aware of the great reputation the city has in Kern County, as well as in the state of California.

A big draw for the city, Meadows says, is the willingness of the city to work with potential developers and retailers, as well as the technological advantages Shafter has. “Having the city connected through our fiber optic lines throughout the city has been a great benefit.”

Looking forward into 2020, Meadows said that the biggest item on the agenda so far is the opening of the Walmart facility. This will mean over 200 jobs for the community, with about a third of the jobs STEM-related – tied to science, technology, engineering and mathematics — with the other two-thirds general laborers.

“We are excited to see how many of the jobs are going to go to Shafter residents, which will mean the dollars staying here locally,” commented Meadows.

Another exciting development for 2020 is the growing relationship between the city and the Kern County Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. The KCHCC has been very beneficial to county and its businesses, Meadows said, with a good many of businesses working with the chamber enrich the local communities.

In addition to the contacts that are made with a relationship with the chamber, they also have made a big impact on local businesses with holding their business academies. The academy is a 12-week program that helps small local businesses learn how to operate successfully, as well as how to market their products and services, and get their companies out in the community. “We are looking forward to the possibility of holding a business academy right here in Shafter for our local businesses,” said Meadows.

As far as new businesses on the horizon, Meadows said that there has been a lot of interest in several locations throughout the city, including the property at Central Avenue and Central Valley Highway that used to house Brookside Deli. “We have a couple of people that are very interested in the property, and they both are food-related, which is good because the property already is equipped to house a food establishment,” Meadows said.

He said that they also have had discussions about different businesses coming to Shafter, including a veterinarian, additional automotive service businesses, a drive-thru car wash and additional medical clinics. “Rural medicine is a big issue in our economy, with a lot of people looking for affordable healthcare,” Meadows said.

The city was the recipient of surplus of sales tax revenue last year. This unexpected development was the result of a large number of customers who ordered products online this year.

Retailer William Sonoma paid the city a large amount of sales tax money that was not forecast. “A lot of people ordered online this last year,” said Meadows, “which was very nice for us.”

Meadows said that the businesses at the Wonderful Logistics Park do amazing things when it comes to business relationships across the state and the United States, but there is not a lot of actual income that is produced out there.

“The difference in the William Sonoma retailer and retailers like Target and Ross is that for the online ordering, the sale is actually in the city of Shafter. With the distribution centers, the sales are not done here, the product is just shipped to and from a location, so the sales tax money goes to the city where the sale actually takes place.”

In addition to the Hispanic Chamber, the city also has been in contact with the Small Business Development Center in Bakersfield for a possible workshop in the near future. The group, based out of Cal State Bakersfield, held a workshop this last year that was well attended and gave local business owners valuable information about how to grow your business, including marketing and creating a presence on social media, as well as how to go about financing a business venture.

“What we are looking at would build on that workshop, becoming a regular meeting that would be set up for our small businesses who may need advice on how to operate their business, as well as getting them in contact with the correct people and agencies to further their success,” Meadows said.

“The business landscape is looking up for Shafter when it comes to all phases of the business arena,” Meadows concluded.

https://www.theshafterpress.com/story/2020/01/09/news/business-landscape-looks-bright-for-city/1204.html

This California Farm Town Is Launching Startups Faster Than Seattle, Boston, and the Bay Area

By Guadalupe Gonzalez Staff reporter
Knowing little English, Rosibel Hurst came to the U.S. from Honduras dreaming of a medical career. She translated her nursing coursework using English-Spanish dictionaries. In 2018, Hurst’s Bakersfield beauty startup made $2 million–which gave her the courage to quit the full-time nursing job she’d kept to support her five-yearold company. “I’m finally going all in,” she says. “I’ll build the business every day and see where it takes me.”
KAYLA REEFER

Once a recurring punch line in Johnny Carson’s monologues, the agriculture-and-oil town of Bakersfield, California–home to the country’s most prolific carrot farm–is not the most obvious example of a West Coast startup hub.

But the Central Valley city, population 400,000, has vaulted onto this year’s Surge Cities list by outperforming 46 other metro areas–including the Bay Area, Boston, and Seattle–in net job and business creation in the past year.

“Incredible things are happening here,” says Irma Olguin Jr., co-founder and CEO of Bitwise Industries, a Fresno-based tech academy and software startup that’s helped create about 1,000 jobs in the area. It’s opening a Bakersfield location in 2020. “We’re seeing validation from VCs and investment banks, and there is a momentum around local revitalization.”

According to Anna Smith, co-founder of local real estate firm Sage Equities, this Bakersfield boom has been helped by entrepreneurial Millennials who’ve returned home from more expensive cities. They’re finding a growing tech community, bolstered by events like the 59-day hackathon led by nonprofit 59DaysofCode.

Maria Coward’s 27-year-old restaurant, La Costa Mariscos, serves authentic Puerto Vallartan seafood dishes in the city’s historic Ice House Building. She recently opened a second location across town.KAYLA REEFER

Latinx founders, whose ranks swelled by 36 percent from 2007 to 2012 in Bakersfield, have also been essential to the city’s evolution. Today, approximately three of every 10 companies in town are Latinx owned, and membership for Bakersfield’s Hispanic Chamber of Commerce has ballooned from 200 businesses to 1,200 in less than a decade.

Rosibel Hurst’s Bellissima Medical Aesthetics is one of 8,500 local Latinx-owned businesses. In 2014, the founder, who was born in Honduras, launched her beauty clinic, which offers procedures such as Botox injections and skin-tightening treatments, from a single room inside of a supportive doctor’s office. Today, Bellissima is profitable, with roughly $2 million in annual sales and 13 employees. “I was able to grow this company because of the help I got from people here,” she says. “Bakersfield is a giving city.”

As the field of startups grows in Bakersfield, so do the resources to sustain it. In 2018, Bakersfield businessman John-Paul Lake co-founded the city’s first angel investing firm, Kern Venture Group, and worked with the city’s community college to create Launchpad, which helps local entrepreneurs grow their businesses.

At Oasis Air Conditioning, founder Ben Dominguez and his 28 employees are expanding into the solar panel market to meet growing demand from the city’s homeowners.KAYLA REEFER

Originally created in Fresno to assist refugee farmers, loan fund Access Plus Capital has doled out 22 microloans worth more than $1.6 million to Bakersfield entrepreneurs since it began servicing the city in 2012.

“People are realizing that the Central Valley is changing,” says Edward Palomar, manager of the fund’s Bakersfield office, which opened in 2017. “They see the opportunity for growth here.”

https://www.inc.com/magazine/202002/guadalupe-gonzalez/bakersfield-california-central-valley-latinx-entrepreneurs-2019-surge-cities.html

FRESNO COUNTY ECONOMIC FORECAST: INTERNATIONAL INTEREST COMES ROLLING IN

Construction activity in Fresno keeps coming, including this three-story office building under construction near Palm and Herndon avenues. Photo by Edward Smith.

Published On December 4, 2019 – 1:33 PM
Written By 

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is one of four economic forecasts The Business Journal does every year for each of the four counties in our coverage area.

This seems to be a prime time for the world to kick the tires on Fresno County.

Interest from companies from far-flung countries including China and Japan has kept economic development officials busy, and even corporate America is taking a closer look at locating in Fresno County on the heels of Amazon and Ulta’s investment in e-commerce distribution centers.

At the same time, Fresno County’s agricultural sector continues to reassert itself as a force to be reckoned with. In fact, based off 2018 crop statistics, Fresno County once again became the top agricultural county in California and the U.S. — a position it hasn’t held since 2013.

Economic development and job creation are job one for Fresno County Economic Development Corp. Will Oliver, director of business services for the Fresno County EDC, noted that 2019 “was filled with much activity, interest and momentum.”

Fresno County welcomed new out-of-state e-commerce operations who either located facilities here or contracted with local third-party logistics partners, Oliver said.

Oliver noted considerable interest in the small cities of Fresno County. One example is Initiative Foods, which is one of the nation’s largest baby food manufacturers, and a major international exporter. It recently completed a 30,000 square foot addition at its Sanger manufacturing plant. Another city, Reedley, is using available resources to lure an advanced food manufacturer.

The region’s designation as a federal Opportunity Zone has done much to jumpstart some of that interest, Oliver noted. The geographical designation provides incentives in the form of reduced capital gains taxes on investments for capital projects.

Fresno County is preparing to kick Opportunity Zone marketing of the region into high gear.

“Much groundwork has been laid to support Opportunity Zone investments by preparing projects and developing a digital prospectus to market the region’s assets, which will be live in 2020,” Oliver said.

Kingsburg recently made big news with T-Mobile’s announcement that it planned to locate a call center there that would create 1,000 jobs, which would be a major jolt to the local economy. That project is contingent on the telecommunication company’s successful merger with Sprint.

Fresno had a bit of a coming-out party earlier this month as host of the California Economic Summit, which included announcements of millions of dollars in investment into the Central Valley. It provided some much-needed momentum heading into the New Year, Oliver noted.

“2020 will certainly be focused on recruiting and expanding high-growth, traded sector companies and industries, such as in health care, agricultural technology and manufacturing,” Oliver said.

On the international front, while much of the economic development work is understandably behind the scenes and not for public consumption, word has trickled down that a Japanese company called Manda Fermentation Co. is on the verge of locating operations in Fresno County. Other Asian countries are looking at the county, undoubtedly drawn to it as a center for international agriculture.

On the agricultural front, Jan. 31, 2020, is a pivotal deadline as the state’s water managers — large and small — must provide plans for how they will manage groundwater usage under the state’s Sustainable Groundwater Management Act.

Ryan Jacobsen, CEO/executive director of the Fresno County Farm Bureau, said the sustainability plans will take 20 years to implement, with progress reports required every five years. But just getting to this stage has taken a lot of time, not to mention paperwork, as each plan is “hundreds, if not thousands of pages long,” he said.

Jacobsen said a number of factors — ongoing trade negotiations with China, new federal scientific guidelines on the pumping of water from the delta and engaged leadership on the local, state and federal level — give him reason for optimism.

Trade friction with China has been especially worrisome.

“The trade issue is front and center,” he said. “I’m optimistic that we can come to an agreement with China. I’ve been an eternal optimist.”

https://thebusinessjournal.com/fresno-county-economic-forecast-international-interest-comes-rolling-in/

MADERA COUNTY HOUSING BOOM COULD SPUR AT LEAST ONE NEW CITY

Brent McCaffrey, president of Tesoro Viejo and McCaffrey Homes, shows visitors from the real estate industry and local governments a model of the town center at Tesoro Viejo, a large, mixed-use community being built in southeast Madera County. Photo by David Castellon

Published On October 25, 2019 – 1:35 PM
Written By 

It’s been about three years since the groundbreaking ceremony for Riverstone, one of two massive planned housing developments being built off Highway 41 in southeast Madera County.

Considering the estimated scope of the project — 6,578 homes on about 2,000 acres — it may not be completed for 30 years or more.

But Riverstone and the other big Madera County development to the north along 41, Tesoro Viejo, aren’t just about home building.

In the mix

Both are mixed-use developments with plans to include commercial, comprised of spaces for office, retail and light industrial businesses alongside stylish homes and recreation options that include parks, community centers and trails that will allow residents to walk, jog or bicycle to the nearby San Joaquin River.

In fact, development groups involved with the 1,600-acre Tesoro Viejo development have erected a little more than 70 of the 5,190 homes planned to be built there, and they’ve already built a Madera County fire station and a county sheriff’s sub station on site, as well as “The Hub,” a welcome center for potential homebuyers, along with a restaurant and a brew house planned for the future.

 

Educational opportunities

Tesoro Viejo has also completed a kindergarten-through-eighth-grade elementary school, and even though only about 20 homes have been occupied, the school is fully operational with children from outside the development bussed in.

Eventually, the plan is for the elementary school to mostly serve children living in Tesoro Viejo, said Brent McCaffrey, president of Tesoro Viejo and McCaffrey Homes, the lead developer on the project.

As for Riverstone, the developers there held a second groundbreaking off 41 and Avenue 12 Thursday afternoon for Riverwalk, the first commercial portion of that project.

The plan is for Riverstone to have 1.5 million square feet of commercial space, with Riverwalk comprising about two-thirds of that, said Timothy Jones, a developer and principal in the company that oversees the development, Riverstone Development LLC.

“We have 95 acres along 41,” for Riverwalk, he said.

 

Multi-family in the works

And the commercial area — which unlike Tesoro Viejo will have no industrial businesses — will be mixed use, meaning that some residential and office spaces will be available above some retail and office spaces, Jones said.

In addition, beyond building the single-family homes in the residential portions of Riverstone, “We anticipate having some apartments, definitely some [condominiums] in the mix,” he added.

Riverstone began construction before Tesoro Viejo, and homes started selling there in 2017. So far, about 400 completed, single-family homes have been occupied, with at least 50 more under construction, Jones said.

 

Building ahead

As for the demand among homebuyers, he said, “We’ve got six builders in there now. We’ve got a couple more trying to get in, and we are building ahead of our expected absorption.”

Some experts have said Madera is in the midst of a building boom, in part because spaces for developments with natural areas have become scarce in the Fresno area.

“Years ago, you had to live on a golf course. New people are requiring outdoor living and trails as the No. 1 thing they’re looking for. In all our entire master-planned communities here in Madera County, that is a big emphasis,” Madera County Supervisor Brett Frazier said.

 

New neighborhoods

At Tesoro Viejo, McCaffrey said the home building will be divided into nine “villages” — essentially neighborhoods — each with its own park, while Jones said 20-23 small parks are planned to be built throughout Riverstone.

Both also are planning to build multiple community centers, while Riverstone’s plans also include the construction of three elementary schools, along with a junior high school and high school.

“The first elementary school is set to break ground in January of 2020” and open in August of 2021, said Jones, adding that even after Riverstone is more fully developed, the schools likely will serve not only students there but also those in nearby areas, including The Ranchos and Rolling Hills.

 

Startups welcomed

Among the selling points at Tesoro Viejo — where three million square feet of commercial space is planned to be built — and Riverstone is residents who may start up or work at businesses in the developments will be able to avoid the traffic and time involved in commuting to and from Fresno, Madera and other nearby areas.

And with the addition of restaurants and possible places for entertainment and shopping, “When people come into the town center, they will hear about the lifestyle, not just a home to live in or a school to go to, but also the social infrastructure where you can live, work, play,” McCaffrey said last month to a group of real estate brokers, local government officials — Frazier among them — and others brought in to hear about the development on a bus tour put on by Fresno State’s Gazarian Real Estate Center.

 

Way of life

In fact, he said his family has donated land to build a Catholic church in the town center.

“So we’re trying to create not just a development, but also the social fabric of the community.”

If this all sounds like a couple of cities in the works, you wouldn’t be far off the mark.

In 1995, Madera County supervisors adopted the Rio Mesa Area Plan, which included supporting residential and commercial development along 15,000 acres of then mostly farmland bordered by Highway 41 to the west, the San Joaquin River to the south, east toward Millerton Lake and Highway 145 to the north.

The plan was to merge those developments into a city, which would be the third in Madera County, after Madera and Chowchilla.

Tesoro Viejo sits in those boundaries, and McCaffrey said he expects his development and possibly some proposed to the south of his could be incorporated someday into a single city.

 

Town of its own

For his part, Jones said his development is far enough south of the Rio Mesa area that it’s unlikely Riverstone is unlikely to be rolled into a city with Tesoro Viejo.

But Riverstone already is a larger development in terms of acreage and number of homes, and on top of that, the developers own about 5,000 adjoining acres they want to get zoned for housing and eventually build an additional 20,000 residential units and dedicate about 600 acres of that for additional commercial development.

“That whole area out there could be another city,” Jones said of Riverstone, but he shied away from saying whether he would support that happening. “You know, we are so far away from that. We’re talking 20 to 40 years before that’s in contemplation realistically. So I can’t tell you the answer to that. I don’t know.”

He added, “I think the issues of becoming a city are complicated.

Gap is bringing 600 jobs to the Fresno area

FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) — Gap Incorporated is set to begin hiring for the 2019 holiday season which will bring more than 600 jobs to the Fresno area.

The company has announced its plans to hire employees for a range of seasonal opportunities including sales associate positions, customer relations representatives and shipment coordinators at distribution centers.

It is hosting a one-day hiring event Saturday, October 5, at all Gap, Banana Republic, Old Navy and other Gap incorporated locations across the United States from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Most contingency offers will be made immediately after interviewing at the hiring event.

All seasonal associates will also enjoy the same merchandise discount as the company’s current associates, just in time for holiday gift-giving.

Signed State Budget Delivers Millions for the Valley

Friday, June 28, 2019

Funding included for Career Technical Education, Safe Drinking Water, and Valley Fever

SACRAMENTO – Today, Assemblymember Rudy Salas (D-Bakersfield) issued the following statement regarding Governor Newsom’s signing of the 2019-2020 state budget:

“Governor Newsom’s first state budget reinforces California’s commitment to supporting working families, small businesses, students, seniors and veterans.  This budget builds record reserves for a rainy day and pays off debt while doing more to shore up working families and tackle challenges of affordability and quality of life,” said Assemblymember Salas.  “This budget invests in the Central Valley by addressing the healthcare workforce shortage, allocating $2 million to support valley fever research and providing millions to address safe and affordable drinking water.  The budget also includes funding to help train, grow, and support our workforce and students by expanding workforce development and youth leadership programs.”

State Budget Includes:

  • $2 million to the Valley Fever Institute at Kern Medical Center to support valley fever research
  • $12.5 million General Fund one-time for safe drinking water in the Central Valley, including $2.5 million to bring communities like Arvin into compliance with safe drinking water standards
  • $705,000 for three Independent Living Centers (ILC), including ILC of Kern County
  • $40,000 for the California Central Valley Economic Development Corporation
  • $1.1 million for planning of Bakersfield College Delano Center: Learning Resource Center Multi-Purpose Building
  • $1.6 million for planning of West Hills College Lemoore Instructional Center Phase 1
  • $12 million over three years for the Youth and Family Civic Engagement Initiative

 

The main budget bill – AB 74 – can be found here.

Valley Fever Funding

“We are grateful to Assemblymember Rudy Salas for authoring this legislation and bringing critical funding to Kern County – where it is needed the most.  As Medical Director for the Valley Fever Institute at Kern Medical, I am honored to lead our clinical team as we continue our mission to increase education and awareness for the public, patients and health care providers; provide the best patient care available and promote research that includes epidemiology, clinical drug development, prevention, immunology and immunizations.  The $2 million in funding will directly help the patients we care for every day at the Valley Fever Institute.” – Royce Johnson, M.D., Medical Director of the Kern Medical Valley Fever Institute and Chief of Infectious Diseases at Kern Medical

“Every day at the Valley Fever Institute we care for patients fighting Valley Fever.  The $2 million will benefit countless people in Kern County and beyond.  We are grateful to our dedicated legislators for supporting this critical funding and working with us to ensure the health of our community.” – Russell V. Judd, CEO, Kern Medical

 

Dolores Huerta and Martin Luther King Jr. Freedom Center’s Youth and Family Civic Engagement Initiative (YFCEI)

“We are grateful that the legislature and the Governor have made it possible to expand the Dolores Huerta Foundation and Martin Luther King Jr. Freedom Center’s Youth and Family Civic Engagement Initiative (YFCEI) to reach more underserved youth throughout California, with a focus on youth engagement, youth empowerment and leadership development utilizing the philosophies of non-violence advocates.  The leadership training that the youth receive will be magnified tenfold as the youth take the lessons learned to address and resolve the many issues that they are confronted with in their respective communities.” – Dolores Huerta

This funding supports the YFCEI’s efforts to serve young people in 12 counties throughout California over the next three years.

 

Independent Living Centers of Kern County

“We want to express our gratitude and dedication to Assemblymember Salas and his staff for the work they have done to maintain equal base rate funding of all Independent Living Centers in CA.  These continued funds come directly to Kern County and stay in Kern County to support the needs of all people with disabilities.” – Jimmie Soto, Executive Director of the Independent Living Center of Kern County

 

California Central Valley Economic Development Corporation

“The California Central Valley Economic Development Corporation is excited about this unique investment to further business development in the Central Valley.  We greatly appreciate Assemblyman Salas championing this effort, and look forward to the development of new and expanding businesses as a result of this program.” – Lance Lippincott, CEO and President of Kings County Economic Development Corporation

We anticipate additional funding for the Central Valley as the Governor signs the remaining budget trailer bills.

https://a32.asmdc.org/press-releases/20190628-signed-state-budget-delivers-millions-valley