Category: Workforce

On the rise? The Central Valley is beating the Bay Area and L.A. in key measures

Bitwise gets grant for job readiness program

Central Valley Business Times 

December 19, 2018

• James Irvine Foundation ponies up $350,000

 • “Unexpected people and places have huge contributions to make”

Bitwise Industries Inc. of Fresno says it has received a two-year grant of $350,000 from the James Irvine Foundation to help pay for its Geekwise Academy web developer job readiness programs.

The programs train unemployed and underemployed workers in the San Joaquin Valley for middle-wage jobs in the tech industry.

“The assumption that to be successful in technology, you must be a computer scientist in the Silicon Valley with a degree from a high-profile university, is one that has kept people in the Central Valley from exploring computer programming as a career,” says Irma Olguin Jr., co-founder and CEO, Bitwise  Industries. “We know that, if given an opportunity, unexpected people and places have huge contributions to make to the technology industry.”

One of the biggest problems facing the tech industry is the inabilityto find talent fast enough to keep up with demand. The purpose of Geekwise, theeducational arm of Bitwise, is to train software developers in Fresno. To date,Geekwise says it has educated 3,500 students and intentionally cultivated astudent population that is more than 50 percent female, 50 percent minority and20 percent first-generation immigrant.

https://files.constantcontact.com/2cb20f61601/3834d3d7-5da2-43f5-aa83-1088bc4a2dc0.pdf

Fresno’s first Black Bear Diner is opening soon — and the restaurant is hiring

BY BETHANY CLOUGH

DECEMBER 20, 2018 01:03 PM

Black Bear Diner is taking over the former Marie Callender’s Restaurant & Bakery space on West Shaw Avenue. It is slated to open in February or March of 2019. 

The first Black Bear Diner in Fresno is one step closer to opening.

The owner of the restaurant said Thursday that the location at 3602 W. Shaw Ave. is scheduled to open in February. She has not set an exact date.

The restaurants are hugely popular among diners in the central San Joaquin Valley, who have long wanted to open one in Fresno.

The Fresno Black Bear is owned by Amy Rose, who revealed new details about the restaurant Thursday.

It is taking over the 7,108-square-foot former Marie Callender’s Restaurant & Bakery near West Shaw and Marty avenues. It will seat 226 people.

The diner will have a meeting room with Wi-Fi available for large groups.

Black Bear Diner will be open from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sundays through Thursdays, and from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays.

The location will employ 92 people and has hired some workers, but is looking for more. Available positions include cooks and prep cooks and experienced servers, hosts and bussers. 

Interested applicants can apply online at Indeed.com. Positions range from minimum wage to $16 an hour, according to the website.

This will be Black Bear’s seventh restaurant in the area owned by the Rose family, including Bob Rose, who owns locations in Visalia, Madera, Tulare, Porterville, Hanford and Los Banos. The family had been planning to build a location in Clovis, but decided to open the restaurant in Fresno instead.

The brand has 119 diners in 12 states.

https://www.fresnobee.com/living/food-drink/bethany-clough/article223368015.html


The Wonderful Co. raises minimum wage to $15 per hour

PREVPREVIOUSROBERT PRICE: The man who literally cleared the way for the …

  • BY JOSEPH LUIZ jluiz@bakersfield.com
  • Dec 19, 2018

Employees at Wonderful Pistachios & Almonds in Lost Hills clap on Wednesday after hearing that full-time employees will be getting a $15 minimum wage starting Jan. 1. Courtesy photo

Employees at Wonderful Pistachios & Almonds in Lost Hills clap on Wednesday after hearing that full-time employees will be getting a $15 minimum wage starting Jan. 1. 

The Wonderful Co. announced on Wednesday that it is increasing its minimum wage to $15 an hour for all its full-time California employees as of Jan. 1.

The change will give more than 2,000 of its employees a 36 percent jump in pay, as the company currently pays a minimum wage of $11 an hour. The company said the increase marks an $80 million investment in its workers across all of its divisions and is the largest wage increase in company history.

The move comes as the state is working toward a $15-an-hour minimum wage by 2022. Gov. Jerry Brown approved a law in 2016 that steadily increases the minimum wage by a dollar every year, from $10 to $15.

“This substantial investment in our workers will have an immediate and meaningful impact on their lives,” co-owner Lynda Resnick said. “In addition to providing our Central Valley employees and their families free health care and education, we are now able to help them achieve a significantly improved standard of living.”

The company said employees were notified of the pay increase on Wednesday during meetings at some of the company’s facilities in the county.

“It felt like: Is this really happening?” said Julio Roja, who works as a forklift driver for Wonderful Pistachios and Almonds in Lost Hills. “We were just in shock. Everybody was happy.”

Roja said he thinks the wage increase is going to make a difference not just for his co-workers but for their families as well.

“I feel like it was a good thing they’re doing. I’m excited for everything that’s going to happen,” he said. “It’s going to make a big difference for my family, and for all of us. This is good news for everybody.”

Fellow employee Yesenia Osornio said the wage increase is just one way the company has shown support for its employees and their families.

“It’s a great company to work for, not only for the wages but the charter schools, scholarships and other things that they do,” she said.

Company officials said full-time employees who make more than the benchmark $15 per hour also will benefit with higher wages; however, it’s unclear what the amount might be or when it might happen.

Dave Szeflin, executive vice president of Wonderful Pistachios and Almonds, was excited to see the response the announcement about the increase would get from employees.

“What we’re trying to do is make The Wonderful Company the employer of choice in the Valley, and this is a big step in getting us there,” he said.

Szeflin said he hopes other Kern County companies will follow The Wonderful Co.’s example, but said that is unlikely to happen immediately.

“I don’t think we’re going to see anything in the next few weeks,” he said. “It takes some time to figure out the logistics.”

Wednesday’s announcement caught some industry insiders off guard.

“It certainly surprised us,” said Jeff Huckaby, president and CEO of Grimmway Farms, a leading agricultural company in Kern County. “We currently are evaluating the potential impact and what it means for the future.”

Huckaby said his company will continue to offer their workforce competitive wages and benefits that allow for a sustainable future. He cautioned about equating Grimmway to other ag companies, as it’s not an “apples to apples” comparison.

“Wonderful operates at the higher end of the industry spectrum … higher earnings, higher margins,” he said. “That’s not our business model.”

Bolthouse Farms, another leading agricultural company in Kern County, didn’t return a request for comment on Wednesday

https://www.bakersfield.com/news/the-wonderful-co-raises-minimum-wage-to-per-hour/article_ce450db0-03f9-11e9-b783-7f0b989ff19d.html

UC Merced working to open new management school

UC Merced is growing and changing and one of the biggest changes will be a new standalone business and management school.By Nathalie GrandaFriday, December 14, 2018 04:18PMMERCED, Calif. (KFSN) –UC Merced is growing and changing and one of the biggest changes will be a new standalone business and management school.

The university is working to create a new interdiscplinary school, one that university officials are calling the “management school of the future”.

“We’re taking existing programs, putting them together and focusing them together on this complex system,” Gallo School Planning Initiative Director Paul Maglio said.

The new Gallo school will bring together educators from the schools of engineering, natural sciences and humanities to teach students under one main focus. The university is already known for its focus on research and science, and the new school will be incorporating those science components into their program.

“In a business school, you tend to focus on profit. In natural resources you tend to focus on the planet. In cognitive science, you tend to focus on people. We’re bringing all that together to have a sustained focus all at the same time,” Maglio said.

The university’s Ernest & Julio Gallo School of Management already has graduate business programs.

Graduate student Taylor Fugere said the science-based business program is what drew her to UC merced, and she’s hopes a new school will bring more interested students.

“I think UC merced moving in that more specialized direction is going to be really helpful in people being able to explore different career options, and being able to have more opportunities for a hands-on educational experience.”

The process will take a few years. Ultimately, the new school will need to be reviewed and approved by several campus administrators, and the University of California regents. University officials hope to have the school in place by 2021.

https://abc30.com/education/uc-merced-working-to-open-new-management-school/4898598/

It’s a great time to be a blue-collar worker

By Bloomberg NewsPosted Dec 16, 2018 at 12:17 PM  

Worker shortage turns US labor market on its head as lower-paying jobs become plentiful and put pressure on employers to pay higher wages.

A surprise shortage of blue collar workers is changing the contours of the U.S. labor market, boosting their pay, narrowing wage inequality and drawing more women into those jobs.

The shortfall is being driven by a shrinking supply of manual and low-pay service workers as the labor force becomes more educated and less willing to take on such jobs, according to a new Conference Board study.

“The divergence between blue collar and white collar supply is going to persist and even become bigger through 2030,” Gad Levanon, chief economist for North America at the New York-based research group and one of the authors of the report, said in an interview.

That is likely to keep upward pressure on labor costs in such industries as construction, transportation and accommodation and food services. It also has implications for inflation and for the Federal Reserve as Chairman Jerome Powell and his colleagues try to sustain the 9-1/2-year-old expansion without overheating the economy. Unemployment at 3.7 percent is the lowest since 1969 and running well below Fed estimates for its long-run sustainable rate.

“The acute shortage of talent in the blue collar space is very, very pronounced,” said Peter Quigley, executive vice president at Kelly Services Inc., a staffing company with branches in all 50 states.

Manufacturers and other companies with physically demanding jobs are finding it tough to fill those positions when baby boomers retire. “It’s harder and harder to attract younger people into those jobs, either because they’re pursuing education alternatives or the stigma associated with light industrial work,” Quigley said.

The supply of lower-skilled workers is also being squeezed by growth in the number of Americans who’ve claimed disability benefits and dropped out of the labor force. Exacerbated by the opioid epidemic, that’s much more concentrated in the population without a bachelor’s degree, the Conference Board report says.

Tighter restrictions on immigration are also playing a role and will continue to do so in the future, said Moody’s Analytics’s Chief Economist Mark Zandi. Many of those foreign workers are lower-skilled and in industries such as construction and farming.

Automation and off-shoring were widely expected to devastate demand for industrial workers and depress their pay, especially when compared with their more educated counterparts. But that hasn’t happened, at least so far, according to the Conference Board: Blue collar and low-pay services jobs have grown as rapidly as total employment since the economy began recovering in June 2009

For much of this expansion, manufacturers and other companies have been slow to ramp up capital spending and step up automation, opting instead to take on more workers to meet rising demand for their products and services.

That’s been reflected in the slow growth of productivity: Output per hour worked has risen at an annual average rate of 1.2 percent since the recession ended in June 2009, well below the 2.2 percent post World War II pace.

Companies may also be approaching the limits of how much of their operations they’re willing or able to outsource. “We’re probably in the third and maybe fourth cycle of outsourcing,” Quigley said. “Most of the large companies, if they were going to outsource, they’ve already done it.”

The combination of surprisingly robust demand for blue collar workers and their limited supply is forcing companies to increase pay at the bottom end of the scale. Minimum wage increases have also helped those less well-off.

That’s helping to reverse the decades-long trend toward greater wage inequality, according to Levanon, who co-wrote the report with economist Frank Steemers.

Besides granting bigger wage increases, companies are getting creative in offering other perks to employees, including more breaks, re-jigged work schedules and greater flexibility for working parents, Quigley said.

The improved packages look to be attracting more women into blue collar jobs. “It helps remove some of the inhibitions or reluctance” some women may have in taking those positions, Levanon said.

The increase in female participation is particularly evident in the transportation sector, where demand for workers has taken off because of the growth of online shopping. “It’s probably ground zero for labor shortages,” Levanon said.

“Lower income workers are doing better,” Moody’s Zandi said. “The balance of power has shifted from employers to employees.”

https://www.recordnet.com/zz/news/20181216/its-great-time-to-be-blue-collar-worker

Pathways to high-quality jobs for young adults

Martha Ross, Kristin Anderson Moore, Kelly Murphy, Nicole Bateman, Alex DeMand, and Vanessa Sacks

Helping young people prepare to engage in work and life as productive adults is a central challenge for any society. Yet, many young people in the United States—particularly those from low-income or less educated families—find that the path to employment and economic security in adulthood is poorly marked or inaccessible.

Using an advanced methodology and longitudinal data, this report examines two main questions:

  • The quality of jobs (as measured by wages, benefits, hours, and job satisfaction) held by 29-year-olds who experienced disadvantage in adolescence
  • Whether particular employment, education, and training experiences in adolescence and early adulthood predict higher-quality jobs for 29-year-olds from disadvantaged backgrounds

We found that while most 29-year-olds are employed, background matters. Among those who were disadvantaged as adolescents, 79 percent are employed at age 29, and among those workers, 38 percent have high-quality jobs as measured by our job quality index. Their counterparts—29-year-olds from non-disadvantaged backgrounds—fare better: 90 percent are employed, and 48 percent of those have high-quality jobs.

29-year-olds from disadvantaged backgrounds are less likely to have high-quality jobs

Job quality among those from disadvantaged backgrounds varies by race and ethnicity: 21 percent of blacks have lower-quality jobs compared to 13 percent of whites and Hispanics. However, after controlling for education, training, work experience, and other characteristics, the gap in job quality scores between blacks and whites disappears, further emphasizing the value of equipping all young people for success in the labor market.

Authors

Turning to our second question, we identified the following factors as associated with higher quality jobs among 29-year-olds from disadvantaged backgrounds: 

Post-secondary education. Consistent with other research, this analysis finds that college degrees (associate, bachelor’s and graduate) are the strongest predictor of a high-quality job among young adults who were disadvantaged as adolescents, highlighting education’s potential as an equalizing force.

Internships, apprenticeships, cooperative education, and mentoring in high school. These work-based learning (WBL) experiences incorporate positive relationships with adults as supervisors and mentors. It is notable that they affect job quality a decade later, given that the effects of training programs sometimes fade over time.

Earlier experiences in the labor market.Having a job as a teenager (ages 16 to 18) predicts higher job quality in adulthood, as do higher wages at age 23. Given that the analysis controls for education, work experience, and other characteristics, the wage finding suggests that regardless of a young person’s education or work history, early good jobs (as measured by wages) lead to later good jobs.

Based on these findings, this report showcases key investments and education and training reforms that would provide more young people with a full range of opportunities as they develop and grow, and better prepare them to tackle the problems and jobs of the future.

Expand work-based learning within high school. Well-designed work-based learning (WBL) experiences enable adults to provide students with developmentally appropriate and incremental guidance that helps them develop the skills that employers seek in new hires. Moreover, it can link students to employers and contacts they would likely never reach on their own, especially if they and their families have limited social and professional networks

Increase completion rates of post-secondary degrees, with an explicit focus on quality and equity. The road to completion must run through quality teaching and curricula, since completion goals otherwise can be gamed by diluting curricula or screening out less-prepared students.

Improve on-ramps to employment for teens and young adults, particularly for those without post-secondary credentials. These on-ramps to employment can take many forms. In addition to the work-based learning programs in high school referenced above, nonprofits and community-based groups can offer them as well, and such organizations may be especially appropriate for older youth who are past high-school age and unsure about college. Programs for these young adults not in high school or college typically offer work readiness and technical skills development, often in combination with academics, mentoring, supportive services, and paid internships or stipends. Well-designed programs align training with local employer needs and look for employment opportunities with potential for advancement.

Promote further research and action on the role of positive relationships in employment and training programs for youth and young adults. Assess the feasibility and value of embedding supportive relationships between young people and caring adults as core principles in education and workforce programs. While it is not new or controversial to say that positive relationships are critical to human development, fostering and supporting such relationships is not always reflected in program design, funding, and implementation.

Download the full report.

One Million Workers: Looking into the future of California’s skilled workforce

NOVEMBER 01, 2018 BY ED COGHLAN


(Photo Credit: Energize Colleges)

The California Economic Summit’s challenge to train one million more skilled workers is a reflection that the Golden State’s workforce needs to be better prepared for the jobs in our fast changing 21st-century economy.

During the past year, Summit team members traveled the state with Van Ton-Quinlivan, executive vice chancellor for Workforce and Digital Futures, California Community Colleges, to discuss the future of workwith employers, leaders and educators in nearly two dozen different areas of California.

“Having completed 22 Future of Work MeetUps in cities of all types across California – urban, rural, suburban and affluent to struggling – I can attest to a common angst as communities anticipate how artificial intelligence and increased automation will impact the workplace,” said Ton-Quinlivan. “Employers and workers both want a playbook to future-proof and increase economic resiliency.”

Workers face several barriers, among them financial challenges and fitting college studies in between work and life responsibilities. These workers are “stranded” by technology and can’t access the current community college system because they either don’t have time to commute to school because of family and work obligations or simply because they live too far away. There are over eight million stranded workers in California, with 2.5 million of those under the age of 35.

Governor Brown signed legislation creating a California online community college to create a more flexible approach to competency-based education that can help many of them realize the California Dream.

“The online college is designed to let students go as fast as they want, with flexible start times to earn an industry valued credential, ” said Van Ton-Quinlivan.

Employers in the state not only have an immediate need to fill the skilled workers pipeline, but a fast-changing economy where employees must be reskilled often to keep pace with technological and competitive advances.

The Community Colleges are consolidating and expanding their work with California employers in ten different economic sectors to make sure that the system is nimbler in developing and offering Career Technical Education courses that can help meet that demand.

For the 2018 California Economic Summit attendees, who will gather in Santa Rosa on November 15-16, will have developing a skilled workforce prominent on its agenda.

Having more skilled workers not only meets the demands of employers but also creates more middle-income jobs, which can help more working-class Californians expand the state’s shrinking middle class.

The Summit is also exploring workforce innovations in the gig economy, which is attracting tens of thousands of workers to flexible but irregular employment. This rapidly growing sector is employing more and more people with upwards of 30 percent of the workforce already engaged in the gig economy. Businesses save resources in terms of benefits, office space and training. But what about the employee? What does their future look like? The Summit will dig into that issue.

To help students and workers advance careers or stay ahead of workplace automation, the Summit will also examine financial support and other ways to help students’ complete programs sooner at lower personal costs and make it easier to tap into training dollars. The Summit plans to discuss how current workforce and education investments, including financial aid policies, needs to be significantly re-imagined, elevating lifelong as a key tool to ensure our workforce and state can compete with the evolution of technology.

Finally, one of the winners from this year’s second annual Partnerships for Industry and Education (PIE) Contest – a competition to honor employer-education partnerships across the state – will lead a discussion on ways the Summit network can grow, strengthen and institutionalize successful partnerships. Public-private partnerships are another pivotal way for California to ensure a competitive workforce.

The California Economic Summit has emerged as the only statewide venue with a comprehensive agenda for taking on the challenges of our time: reducing income inequality, increasing economic security and community resiliency in a time of climate change, bolstering wealth generation, and restoring upward mobility.

http://caeconomy.org/reporting/entry/one-million-workers-looking-into-the-future-of-californias-skilled-workforc

 

Kern proposes $3 million hiring incentive for Amazon

Amazon would receive $3 million in local tax rebates in exchange for employing 1,000 Kern County residents at the 2.6 million-square-foot distribution center the retail giant is building next to Meadows Field Airport, according to a proposal released Thursday.

The incentives package, scheduled for a vote Tuesday by the county Board of Supervisors, would give annual refunds to one of the world’s most valuable companies in an amount equal to half its combined property, sales and use tax bills — an estimated $575,000 per year before the rebate — for an estimated 11 years.

In exchange, Amazon would be required to create 1,000 new jobs for Kern County residents with an average annual wage of $31,000 per job. At least 900 of those positions would have to be filled by October 2021.

The offer would expire in 30 years if the rebates have not been used by that time. The county could rescind the package at any time if Amazon does not meet and keep up its job-creation obligations under the agreement.

“The strength in the incentive being proposed is the time-bound nature of the job creation, coupled with the requirement that these are NEW jobs for Kern County residents,” county spokeswoman Megan Person said by email. “We have the ability to ensure our residents get these jobs, get paid a sustainable wage and they do it by a specific date.”

The incentive, if approved, would be the second time the county has used the Advance Kern Incentive Program the board created in 2017. The first, approved by the board in August, offered L’Oreal USA $2.3 million in tax rebates in exchange for the company’s pledge to create 155 new jobs at the distribution center it plans to open at the Tejon Ranch Commerce Center south of Bakersfield. No other Advance Kern incentives are currently under negotiation, Person wrote.

County officials confirmed in September Amazon’s plan to open a “fulfillment” center just north of Bakersfield at the 138-acre Landings Logistics Center LLC just north of Merle Haggard Drive. Industry observers have said the center might ultimately employ up to 2,000 people.

Amazon has not publicly confirmed its plan to open a distribution center in Kern. A company representative did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the incentives package.

John Cox can be reached at 661-395-7404. Follow him on Twitter: @TheThirdGraf.

Central Valley companies get more than

Central Valley Business Times

$2.6 Million to train workers

  • Employment Training Panel awards more than $13 million statewide
  • Will see about 9,000 workers trained California’s Employment Training Panel has approved 41 contracts worth more than $13 million to train nearly 9,000 workers.

The largest grant — nearly $895,000 — goes to Applied Materials Inc. in Santa Clara to train 710 workers in the manufacturing of semiconductor chips for electronics and other technologies. Applied Materials uses nano-manufacturing equipment, machines and tools to make input products for semiconductor wafers and chips, flat panel displays, high-density batteries, solar photovoltaic cells and modules, and other electronics.

“We are proud to support innovative businesses by helping them meet their needs for skilled workers,” says Employment Training Panel Executive Director Stewart Knox. “The funds approved address job creation and retention while increasing opportunities for workers through the development of job skills and training.”

Among the training aimed at companies in the Central Valley are these grants that total more than $2.6 million:

  • $187,200 to El Clasificado, a Norwalk-based Hispanic multimedia publication and advertising company, to train 18 workers in Kern, Fresno, and San Bernardino counties in business and computer skills. This will be El Clasificado’s seventh ETP agreement, the third within the last five years. In its first few projects, the company was funded as a small business starting with 30 employees. By its fifth ETP project in in 2013, it had reached more than 100 full-time employees with four new locations..

In this new proposal, El Clasificado says it will expand its training plan to more trainees. To remain competitive, El Clasificado says it must expand product offerings for social media services and video advertising. The company is now  building digital core competencies internally across all platforms which will be the focus of this training.

  • $199,576 to California Natural Products in Lathrop to train about 1216 workers in computer and hazardous materials skills, along with management and manufacturing skills. The company makes nutritional, natural and organic food ingredients, and patented the natural processes for rice syrup, rice syrup solids and rice milk.

The training is to ensure that the staff is up-to-date with all “lean goals. Supervisor training will include how to become a better communicator, excelling as a supervisor and management skills for first time supervisors.

  • $109,746 to College of the Sequoias in Visalia to train about 234 workers in business, computer, literacy, management and other skills. In this proposal, COS says it will collaborate with manufacturing companies including electric car maker Faraday Future and food products maker Nestle. These companies are experiencing significant growth and seek retraining to enhance employee skills.
  • $173,940 to Rancho Cordova-based Express Sewer & Drain Inc. to offer training to about 120 frontline supervisors, pipefitters, plumbers, laborers, administration staff and the company owner in managing larger projects and customer service. Topics include customer service, client services and communication among others.
  • $525,824 to the Gallo Cattle Company in Atwater to train about 316 workers. In this agreement, Gallo Cattle will focus on advanced training in computer software, comprehension and business development to allow trainees to increase their current skills while also being cross-trained in additional topics such as Six Sigma, Navision, JET Reporting and introduction to electrical.
  • $226,200 to Ready Roast Nut Company LLC of Madera to train about 250 workers to better meet customer demand. To do this, employees must be trained on enhanced production techniques and newly purchased high-speed equipment such as the mixer drum and drag tube conveyors. Ready Roast will also cross train production staff to support growth and upgrade skills of its current and future employees. Training will focus on upgrading trainees manufacturing skills, business skills and customer service for all trainees.
  • $195,247 to the San Joaquin County Economic Development Association of Stockton so it can offer customized training for individual employers at the employers’ facilities. This includes customer service, communication skills, and project management. Training is intended to provide the skills to effectively and efficiently maintain business operations.
  • $805,376 to the Wine Group Inc. of Tracy, one of the world’s largest wine producers. The company plans to train 484 workers in Alameda, Fresno, Kern, Madera, Monterey, San Joaquin and Tulare counties in computer and business skills along with continuous improvement in all occupations.
  • $198,978 to Vellutini Corporation dba Royal Electric Company of Sacramento to train more than 230 workers in business, computer, hazardous materials and other skills. Royal Electric says it has seen an increase in demand for its services, which has led to significant growth in recent years and thus it must upgrade staff skills to meet demand.
  • $73,632 to J.R. Putman Inc. of Rancho Cordova, which installs and repairs of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning HVAC); plumbing; and solar and insulation equipment, to train 82 workers in computer, business, management and other skills.

The Employment Training Panel reimburses employers for the costs of training existing workers, funds training for unemployed workers to re-enter the workforce and helps ensure California businesses have the skilled workers they need to remain competitive.

http://files.constantcontact.com/2cb20f61601/fe5aaf6a-6bac-4c82-8312-ea7f04d49b2a.pdf