Category: Workforce

New school for barbers and cosmetologists opens in Clovis

 

By Jason Oliveira

Monday, October 15, 2018 06:24PM

CLOVIS, Calif. (KFSN) — For those looking to break into the cosmetology or barbering field Clovis’ Institute of Technology now offers a career training program.

Officials held a ribbon cutting ceremony Monday to help kick off the Academy of Hair Design.

“Right now I have nine barbers enrolled and four cosmetologists, there’ s definitely a high demand for barbering,” said Program Director, Ramanda Ramirez.

Officials say the resurgence in men’s grooming was enough to launch the program.

In fact, the employment of barbers is projected to grow 13% over the next eight years, that’s faster than the average for all occupations.

Joseph Guzman of Corcoran decided to sign up for the new program after seeing an online ad.

He’s now part of the Institute’s first wave of students learning cutting-edge hair styling techniques.

And it’s not just all about the locks, these students are taught skills that can help them market themselves on social media.

Officials say the 10-month course not only promises real work training and experience but the business skills needed to succeed after graduation.

The idea to enroll in the school’s new venture into cosmetology and barbering is what drew Alyssa Parish of Mendota to the program.

“It’s really nice, we get a lot of new things and everything is brand new and it’s high tech,” said Alyssa Parish.

Once again the course goes 10-months and costs just under $20,000.

Students can begin cutting hair for $5 beginning in December.

https://abc30.com/careers/new-school-for-barbers-and-cosmetologists-opens-in-clovis/4491811/

Gap hiring in October for seasonal warehouse jobs

September 18, 2018 12:21 PM

Updated September 18, 2018 12:22 PM

You can get a job at Caltrans in two days. It still has 1,100 openings.

 

 

By Adam Ashton

September 12, 2018 05:15 AM

 

Forget the stereotypes of California state government’s painfully slow process for hiring new workers.

This summer, it was possible to walk into a Caltrans hiring fair and leave with a job offer.

Motivated by a wave of retirements and an urgency to fill new positions created by the state’s gas tax increase, Caltrans devised a bureaucracy-defying human resources program that let it bring on hundreds of new employees at a time during hiring events. Almost 600 people have joined the department through those two-day job fairs.

“It was a very quick turnaround,” said Andy Chou, 29, a new Caltrans structural engineer who went to a hiring fair at Sacramento State in May had a job offer within days. He started work last month. “I was definitely surprised by” the speed of the department’s hiring.

There’s more good news if you know someone looking for a job – Caltrans still has another 1,100 vacancies.

The rush to hire comes mainly from Senate Bill 1, the 10-year gas tax and vehicle fee increases the Legislature adopted in 2017 to fund a decade’s worth of transportation projects.

Voters in November will see a bid to repeal the tax on the ballot which would jeopardize funding. So far, unions, contractors and local governments working to defend SB 1 have raised more than $26 million to defeat the repeal. Groups that want to repeal the tax have raised about $2.5 million.

Caltrans is moving forward as if the repeal initiative would fail, and is filling jobs at a fast clip. The state budget Gov. Jerry Brown signed in June sets Caltrans on track to add 1,150 new positions over the next 11 months, up from 19,109 last year.

“We are making a dent,” said Michelle Tucker, the department’s human resources director. “I’m really pleased with the innovative hiring techniques we’ve done this summer.”

California’s web site for applying for state jobs – jobs.ca.gov – has been redesigned to guide applicants through the hiring process.

It’s racing to add staff in a hot economy in which other engineering firms and local governments also are bulking up.

“They need design staff to deliver state highway projects,” said Ted Toppin, executive director of Professional Engineers in California Government. “That’s what Californians expect. Right now they’re competing with other state and local departments and the private sector for engineers, so the need to on-board them is real or they’re going to lose them.”

Caltrans had a long-approaching retirement wave, especially among its engineering ranks. In 2016, the average age of the state’s civil engineers was 51, and 52 among electrical engineers.

Meanwhile, the Brown administration shrank the headcount at Caltrans over much of the past decade. The department had 10,143 employees in the division that plans road projects in 2013. That number shrank to about 7,000 two years ago. It’s expected to grow again to 8,700 by next year.

“The department did not hire engineers and related staff for over 10 years,” Toppin said. “From 2007 to 2017 they sort of shed 3,500 positions,” he said. “Year after year, it was no replacement of folks who retired, so they’re an older workforce.”

PECG’s three-year contract that expired in July also did not give engineers a reason to stay. Brown did not commit to a raise this year when his administration negotiated the contract with the union in 2015.

Between July 2017 and July 2018, 922 Caltrans employees retired.

PECG’s new contract includes some incentives that would keep longtime engineers in the workforce developing projects funded by the gas tax increase, including an immediate 4.5 percent raise and an escalating seniority differential that rises to an extra 5.5 percent for engineers with 23 years of experience at Caltrans by 2021.

Caltrans crafted four rapid-hiring events it held this year with the state human resources department. They allowed people to apply for jobs in person, be interviewed by panels of managers, have their qualifications reviewed and references checked within two days. If they passed, they’d walk out with a conditional job offer.

“We’re able to do hundreds of interviews in a day,” Tucker said.

Usually, landing a state job takes much longer. The only other state departments that regularly use rapid-hiring events are the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and the Prison Industry Authority, Cal HR spokesman Andrew LaMar said.

Jeff Wiley, Caltrans’ assistant division chief for project management, said the department has been attracting engineers with a range of experience, from new graduates to veterans from other states.

The department and PECG negotiated a compromise to get more experienced engineers working on projects as soon as possible. The agreement lets Caltrans slightly increase the amount of work it sends to private contractors, although the department has not yet exceeded its traditional outsourcing cap.

“We’ve got some plans out for making those goals,” Wiley said.

Toppin said the agreement was reasonable considering the department’s “sudden increase in revenue” and shortage of experienced engineering staff.

 

Read more here: https://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/the-state-worker/article218170925.html#storylink=cpy

Stronger job market seen for California, Central Valley to Lead

Central Valley Business Times

Sept. 11, 2018

•  Central Valley’s major markets expected to see some job growth

•  Stockton, Sacramento to outpace national growth rate

California employers expect to hire at a solid pace during the fourth quarter, according to surveys by the staffing firm ManpowerGroup (NYSE: MAN).

Among the state’s employers surveyed, 25 percent plan to hire more workers from October through December. This number is offset by the 4 percent that plan to reduce payrolls, while 70 percent of employers expect to maintain current staff levels and 1 percent indicate they are not sure of their hiring plans. This yields a net employment outlook of 21 percent.

“Employers in the California anticipate a stronger hiring pace compared to Q3 2018 when the net employment outlook was 18 percent,” says ManpowerGroup spokesman Frank Armendariz. “At this time last year, employers expected remain stable hiring activity when the outlook was 20 percent.”

Manpower’s net employment outlook is derived by taking the percentage of employers anticipating an increase in hiring activity and subtracting from this the percentage of employers expecting a decrease in hiring activity.

Here are Manpower’s outlooks for the Central Valley’s four largest markets, from south to north:

•  Bakersfield Bakersfield employers expect to hire at a “respectable” pace during Q4, says ManpowerGroup.

Among employers surveyed, 21 percent plan to hire more employees from October through December. This number is

offset by the 5 percent that plan to reduce payrolls, while 72 percent of employers expect to maintain current staff levels and 2 percent indicate they are not sure of their hiring plans. This yields a net employment outlook of 16 percent.

“Employers in the Bakersfield MSA anticipate a stonger hiring pace compared to Q3 2018 when the net employment outlook was 13 percent,” says Mr. Armendariz. “At this time last year, employers expected less hiring activity when the outlook was 20 percent.”

•  Fresno Fresno area employers expect to hire at a positive pace during the Fourth Quarter, says Manpower.

Among employers surveyed, 17 percent plan to hire more employees from October through December. This number is offset by the 3 percent that plan to reduce payrolls, while 80 percent of employers expect to maintain current staff levels and 0 percent indicate they are not sure of their hiring plans. This

yields a net Employment Outlook of 14 percent.

“Employers in the Fresno MSA anticipate a steady hiring pace compared to Q3 2018 when the net employment outlook was 15 percent,” says Mr. Armendariz. “At this time last year, employers expected similar hiring activity when the outlook was 15 percent.”

•  Stockton Stockton-Lodi MSA employers expect to hire at an active pace during Quarter 4 2018, according to ManpowerGroup.

Among employers surveyed, 26 percent plan to hire more employees from October through December. This number is offset by the 2 percent that plan to reduce payrolls, while 71 percent of employers expect to maintain current staff levels and 1 percent indicate they are not sure of their hiring plans. This yields a net employment outlook of 24 percent.

“Employers in the Stockton-Lodi MSA anticipate a stronger

hiring pace compared to Q3 2018 when the net employment outlook was 19 percent,” says ManpowerGroup spokeswoman Danielle Switalski. “At this time last year, employers expected similar hiring activity when the Outlook was 26 percent.”

•  Sacramento Employers in the metropolitan Sacramento area expect to hire at a solid pace during Quarter 4 2018, according to Manpower.

Among employers surveyed, 29 percent plan to hire more employees from October through December. This number is offset by the 6 percent that plan to reduce payrolls, while 64 percent of employers expect to maintain current staff levels and 1 percent indicate they are not sure of their hiring plans. This yields a net employment outlook of 23 percent.

“Employers in the Sacramento MSA anticipate a steady hiring pace compared to Q3 2018 when the net employment outlook was 24 percent,” says Mr. Armendariz. “At this time last year, employers expected more hiring activity when the Outlook was

19 percent.”

Statewide, for the coming quarter, job prospects appear best in the following job categories: construction; durable goods manufacturing; nondurable goods manufacturing; transportation & utilities; wholesale & retail trade; information; financial activities; professional & business services; education & health services; leisure & hospitality; other services and government.

Of the more than 11,500 employers surveyed in the United States, 22 percent expect to add to their workforces and 5 percent expect a decline in their payrolls during Quarter 4 2018. Seventy- one percent of employers anticipate making no change to staff levels and the remaining 2 percent of employers are undecided about their hiring plans.

When seasonal variations are removed from the data, the net employment outlook is +19 percent which is relatively stable compared to the Quarter 3 2018 Outlook, +18 percent.

About the surveys The ManpowerGroup Employment Outlook Survey is conducted quarterly to measure employers’ intentions to increase or decrease the number of employees in their workforces during the next quarter. The United States results are based on interviews with 11,500+ employers located in the 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, which includes the largest 100 Metropolitan Statistical Areas based on the number of business establishments. The mix of industries within the survey follows the North American Industry Classification System Supersectors and is structured to be representative of the U.S. economy.

http://files.constantcontact.com/2cb20f61601/24b45bff-da33-42c3-8406-d3d2d7ee50ea.pdf

Ready to Work, ready to succeed

Roger Lawson

Aug. 22, 2018

A typical day for the 27-year-old Lawson begins with a breakfast of jail grub and continues with community-service volunteer work loading boxes or landscaping.

And after the work, it’s back to the Honor Farm, back to the jail grub, back to the nine other men in Lawson’s program, and back to the so-called mattress, with lights out at 10:30 p.m.

But you won’t hear Lawson complain because it’s the life he has chosen, at least for now.

“Once you get around people that actually want to help you,” Lawson said, “you actually want to start to better yourself, too.”

Lawson is one of the first 10 participants in the inaugural cohort of homeless men enrolled in a residential job-training program run by Ready To Work, a Stockton-based nonprofit that was awarded $1.4 million in grant funding three months ago by the San Joaquin County Board of Supervisors.

Ready To Work’s aim is to set the men up with housing, job training and, ultimately, paying jobs — all aimed at giving participants a better opportunity to succeed once they leave the program after a maximum of 15 months.

“The people who are here want to be here and they’re focused,” said Jon Mendelson, Ready To Work’s executive director.

Mendelson has based his program — which may reach its 45-man capacity within a month — on one in New York that assists men who are leaving homeless shelters or the criminal justice system.

According to data from New York, nearly 80 percent of its participants are employed six months after they have exited and taxpayers save $3.60 for every dollar spent on the program.

Ready To Work is providing its participants training, food and sleeping quarters. After the initial adjustment to the program, the men are dispatched as supervised work groups in the community.

They are paid salaries, and with housing and food taken care of, the men have an opportunity to build a nest egg by the time they exit the program for their own apartments and a chance to build a new, independent life.

Lawson, who has a high school diploma and some college credits, moved from North Carolina to California several years ago, joining his mother in Stockton.

Strained family relations eventually pushed him out of his mother’s door and into the Stockton Shelter for the Homeless, where he lived while working for short stints at Walmart and for an alarm company.

While at the shelter, Lawson said he eventually met someone who knew of a job traveling with California Carnival Company setting up and tearing down the rides as various fairs moved from one city to another.

But the backbreaking work and 16-hour days were not what Lawson wanted for the rest of his life, so he returned once more to Stockton, staying at the shelter and at the Gospel Center Rescue Mission. When Lawson learned what Ready To Work was doing, he jumped at the opportunity.

“I need a steady source of income and transportation so I can get my own home,” he said. “I think this is a good stepping stone and opportunity for a lot of people to basically come up in the world.”

Leading visitors Wednesday around the yard, which includes a pingpong table and a basketball court, Mendelson pointed to 12-foot perimeter fencing covered with slats and topped by barbed wire, and he said there have yet to be any security breaches. Additionally, Ready To Work Program Director Deborah Johnson just happens to be the retired warden of the Central California Women’s Facility in Chowchilla, so she knows a thing or two about security. Johnson said collaboration between Ready To Work and the Sheriff’s Office led to the enhanced fencing and the barbed wire that tops it.

“We also worked on trying to ensure that the movement between their inmates and our clients out of that area is limited,” Johnson said. “So when (inmates are) moving to and from their dining facility … our clients are pretty much inside.”

 

Lawson said that in his mind, the precautions are unnecessary. His plans, he said, do not include attempting to interact with inmates. He has loftier visions.

“My own apartment, own place to stay, transportation, of course, maybe a nice car,” he said. “This is some foundation, some place that I can establish myself and be on my own feet without having to ask anybody for anything. It’s basically for independence and freedom, you know?”

http://www.recordnet.com/news/20180822/ready-to-work-ready-to-succeed

Fresno State named one of the 100 best schools in the country

VOLT Institute Graduates Inaugural Class

MODESTO, CA — On June 27, nearly a year after opening, VOLT Institute saw the graduation of its

first class of maintenance mechanic students. VOLT Institute, a partnership of Opportunity Stanislaus

and Stanislaus County Office of Education, was started at the request of local employers looking for

skilled candidates to fill existing and future vacancies. Employers set a priority of training maintenance

mechanics, a field with widespread shortages including over 300 openings in Stanislaus County alone.

Austin Parker, 22, is one of the graduates. He credits the program with his new job at Hughson Nut,

citing the teachers, hands-on learning, and personalized pace as benefits.

 

“VOLT was a greatopportunity,” said Parker. “It has already opened up a ton of doors for me. The instruction at VOLT

was hands-on and kept pace with students and the job placement assistance was beyond what any other

college would do. Thanks to VOLT I no longer just have a job- I have a career.”

 

Parker’s situation is not unique. In fact, VOLT boasts an 88% placement rate among graduates.

Opportunity Stanislaus CEO David White has been a driver of VOLT since the planning stages. “We

have come so far so fast and are excited about the momentum we’re gaining,” said White. “We have

the best equipment—machines that simulate industry facilities—and we have a team that is absolutely

committed to the success of the students. We look forward to great things.”

 

In addition to the 11-month Industrial Maintenance Mechanic program, VOLT also has a 3-month

Certified Production Technician program and workshops on a wide variety of business topics. Training

areas will continue to expand as the student population and capacity grows. “Stanislaus County Office

of Education has a tradition of preparing students for the workforce through education,” said Executive

Director Deb Rowe.

“VOLT is a great example of multi-sector partnership training, the industry

recognized certifications through VOLT qualify student for a living wage job which affirms we are

headed in the right direction to support our community and beyond.”

 

VOLT Institute recently made news when it was awarded $1,000,000 in the 2018-19 California State

Budget to expand training for high-demand careers in manufacturing, one of the county’s most critical

industries. The funding will support the expansion of an education and training partnership between

Modesto Junior College (MJC), Stanislaus County Office of Education (SCOE), and Opportunity

Stanislaus to prepare students for jobs based on employer demand. The grant will serve as the local

match necessary for a federal United States Department of Commerce, Economic Development

Administration grant.

 

New classes start October 8 and continue through September 5 of 2019. For more information or to

enroll please visit www.voltinstitute.com or call 209.566.9102.

Software engineering school opens inStockton

Central Valley Business Times

August 10, 2018

  • Code Stack Academy seeks students
  • “We know firsthand the challenge in recruitment and retention of software engineers”

Stockton’s first immersive, accelerated software engineering school offering students paths to high-paying careers and source for businesses in need of highly skilled employees has opened.

The San Joaquin County Office of Education says it has officially launched “Code Stack Academy,” Stockton’s first accelerated software engineering school. The immersive  coding school provides a route for students pursuing careers in technology and will help build a community of software engineers in the region ready to meet the growing demand for a highly skilled workforce.

“Students will have opportunities to find well-paid jobs with local businesses in need of workers with software-engineering skills,” says San Joaquin County Superintendent of Schools James Mousalimas.

Code Stack Academy offers a combination of hands-on workshops, one-on-one mentoring with career-experienced developers, peer-to-peer learning, and real-world project experience. It uses project-based “gamification” to measure progress and provide a fun and engaging experience. Students gain points as they complete projects. Points allow progression through the curriculum.

In addition to the full, nine-month course, Code Stack offers three-day and one-day Foundation Workshops throughout the year that teach core concepts of web development and equip students with all the basics to develop simple websites.

No previous coding experience is required for either the workshops or the academy course. Students must be 18 years or older to enroll. The first nine-month Academy Course begins in November.

Code Stack Academy will be operated through the SJCOE’s Center for Educational Development and Research, a software engineering department responsible for building web, software, or mobile apps used by over 5,000 school districts nationwide and over a dozen state agencies.

“We have the resources, curriculum, expertise, and experience to provide a broad and deep dive into software engineering,” says Johnny Arguelles, director of CEDR. “And as an employer,

we know firsthand the challenge in recruitment and retention of

software engineers.”

Business and government leaders voiced their support for the new Code Stack Academy and its potential to benefit San Joaquin County.

“Our community needs a workforce trained in technology to support growth of our current businesses and attract others to our area. This program will help to meet those needs,” says Jane Butterfield, president and chief executive officer of the Business Council of San Joaquin.

For more information:

https://codestackacademy.org/

Workers need more training to succeed in “gig” economy. In Stockton and Richmond, they’ll get it.

July 12, 2018 01:00 PM

Updated July 12, 2018 01:00 PM

Employers needed in Kings County for subsidized workers

CVBT

July 11, 2018

• Program takes care of workers comp and other expenses
• “The participants that have been sent my way want to work and are willing to learn”

Public and non-profit agencies in Kings County that need more workers but don’t have the money might be able to get help
from a subsidized workforce of individuals who have been affected by recent natural disasters.

The program is also open to private firms that have positions available that are specifically for clean-up and repair of a public
or private non-profit facility. It’s being managed by Proteus Inc., a Hanford-based private non-profit community-based organization has received
$185,868 in funding for it from La Cooperativa de Campesina .

Currently, Proteus is partnering with the city of Hanford’s public works department and has placed 20 workers within the
department. “Having the extra help to address work duties is helpful beyond words,” says Tim Breashers, parks and grounds superintendent
with Kings County Public Works. “The participants that have been sent my way want to work and are willing to learn.”

Proteus will handle payroll functions and cover workers compensation costs. Prevailing wages are paid to all participants. Other agencies participating in the program include Kings County public works, Corcoran public works, and Lemoore public works.

“I would like to emphasize that Proteus recruits the participants, handles all the paperwork and payroll functions,” says Araceli
Ochoa of Proteus. “This is a fantastic opportunity to assist individuals to connect with work and at the same time help
improve our local communities. All the worksites are required to be in Kings County.”

Low-income individuals who live in Kings County and who are temporarily or permanently laid off work as a consequence of a
natural disaster are eligible as are self-employed individuals who became unemployed or significantly underemployed as a
result of the disaster.

Kings County has been recognized as an area that is at risk for a flood post drought. This program is designed to provide
temporary employment for those residents who have been unemployed due to the disaster or long-term unemployed as a
result of previous disasters, as well as provide relief for local organizations to assist in clean-up and/or repair of the site, a
Proteus spokesman explains in an email to CVBT.

Each worker will have a worksite agreement for up to six months or $14,000, whichever comes first, he adds. The program is set to end September 30, “however Proteus is hopeful for an extension.” Additional worksites are needed in order to achieve program goals and help local residents. For more information contact
Petra Solano at (559) 582-9253.

http://files.constantcontact.com/2cb20f61601/7b013146-866d-4dfa-b9be-e63b09dfa4c6.pdf