Category: New Developments

PROPOSED NEW VALLEY CHILDREN’S CLINIC, COMMERCIAL CENTER CLEARS HURDLE

The Tulare County Planning Commission has recommended the approval of the Sequoia Gateway Commerce and Business Park near Visalia.

Published On November 16, 2018 – 12:20 PM
Written By David Castellon
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The Tulare County Planning Commission voted Wednesday to recommend county supervisors approve a large shopping, hotel, office and medical complex off Highway 99 near Visalia.

Plans for the Sequoia Gateway Commerce and Business Park off the southeast exit of Caldwell Avenue and Highway 99, just outside the Visalia city limits, would include in its first phase a 60,000-square-foot Valley Children’s Medical Group Specialty Care Center, along with a gas station and convenience store, fast food and retail outlets built on 12.4 acres.

The second phase would include a hotel, additional retail and fast food spaces, restaurants and office space built on 101 acres.

A visitors center also is planned for the site.

Valley Children’s reportedly plans to relocate its Akers Specialty Care Center in Visalia to the new, larger locale, with projections that about 30,000 patients may be seen there over a decade.

A commission representative is tentatively scheduled to present the group’s recommendation during the Dec. 4 Tulare County Board of Supervisors meeting.

https://thebusinessjournal.com/proposed-new-valley-childrens-clinic-commercial-center-clears-hurdle/

MANUFACTURER AWARDED TAX CREDIT FOR BIOLA EXPANSION

Published On November 5, 2018
Written By Gabriel Dillard

NutriaAg has been awarded a $180,000 state tax credit to help expand its manufacturing facility in Biola, just west of Fresno.

Headquartered in Toronto, NutriAg makes and distributes environmentally friendly fertilizers and plant nutrients. It opened its Biola plant in 2015.

The tax credit is part of the California Competes program, which is administered through the Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development, or GO-Biz. The credit is aimed at businesses that want to locate or grow in the state.

As part of the tax credit agreement, NutriAg plans to invest $1.62 million in its expansion plans over the next three years, as well as hire at least seven new employees in that span.

All together, GO-Biz on Monday approved $70 million in tax credits for 17 companies that would create more than 2,000 jobs.

Lockheed Martin was awarded a $39.5 million tax credit — the largest single tax credit in the program’s five-year history. The company has committed to adding 450 new jobs in addition to retaining over 2,400 existing employees in its “Skunk Works” operations near Palmdale.

The next application period begins on Jan. 2, 2019 with $75 million in tax credits available.

For more information, visit this blog from the Fresno County Economic Development Corp.

https://thebusinessjournal.com/manufacturer-awarded-tax-credit-for-biola-expansion/?utm_source=Daily+Update&utm_campaign=e403c6474a-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_11_05_09_09&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_fb834d017b-e403c6474a-78934409&mc_cid=e403c6474a&mc_eid=a126ded657

Large tax incentive seals the deal for new hotel, conference center in Oakhurst

BY WILLIAM RAMIREZ

New Industrial Building to Be Built at the Tejon Ranch Commerce Center

Tejon Ranch Co. and Majestic Realty Co. form a new joint venture to construct a 580,000-square-foot Class-A industrial facility

TEJON RANCH, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Nov. 2, 2018– Tejon Ranch Co. (NYSE: TRC) announced today a third joint venture agreement with Majestic Realty Co., the nation’s largest privately-held industrial developer, this one to build an approximate 580,000-square-foot speculative industrial building at the Tejon Ranch Commerce Center (TRCC).

The new building will be located next to a 480,480-square-foot building Tejon and Majestic built in 2017 and subsequently leased to Dollar General and L’Oréal USA in 2018. Dollar General’s lease effectively increased its footprint at TRCC by 40-percent, as it currently leases more than 600,000-square feet in a separate building located on the west side of Interstate 5. L’Oréal USA is moving its SalonCentric operation from a facility in Valencia, about 40 minutes south of TRCC.

“Given the success with our most recent building, and with the demand we’re seeing out of Southern Californiaand elsewhere, we wanted to move as quickly as possible to bring another new building online,” said Joseph N. Rentfro, Tejon Ranch Co.’s Executive Vice President of Real Estate. “Whoever occupies the space will find an abundant and high-quality labor pool to draw from and the opportunity to apply for tax incentives through the County of Kern’s AdvanceKern initiative, as did L’Oréal USA, which was approved for $2.3 million in tax rebates.”

“There continues to be a very tight market in terms of both available product and land available for the development of large scale distribution centers in Southern California,” said Majestic Realty Co. Senior Vice President, Brett Tremaine. “The Tejon Ranch Commerce Center features turn-key sites for distribution, manufacturing and e-commerce operations that allow users to serve southern and northern California, as well as all 11 western states, from one location, and as we believe many more companies currently located in the Los Angeles basin, like SalonCentric, will want to avail themselves of the Tejon Ranch Commerce Center’s strategic location and outstanding labor pool, it’s important to have a building ready for them.”

The building’s 34-acre site has more than 2,000 feet of frontage along the east side of I-5, just a half-mile north of the I-5/Laval Road interchange, providing almost immediate access to California’s principal north/south highway, with the ability to serve nearly 90% of California consumers within a single day truck turn. The Class-A cross-dock distribution facility will feature a 36-foot clear height, ESFR sprinkler system, 62 dock high doors, 177 trailer parking stalls and 327 vehicle parking stalls. A 180-foot wide truck court will allow for maximum efficiency and maneuverability.

Construction is expected to begin later this year or early 2019, with completion anticipated in the third quarter of 2019.

Tejon Ranch and Majestic also jointly own a fully-leased 651,909-square-foot industrial building within the Tejon Ranch Commerce Center on the west side of I-5, adjacent to IKEA’s 1.8 million square foot distribution center.

John DeGrinis, SIOR, senior executive vice president of Colliers International will serve as the listing broker for the new development.

https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20181102005085/en/

Gallo will expand into vacant Seneca fruit cannery in Modesto

Seneca on Finch Road in Modesto, Calif. is pictured on Monday October 29, 2018. E.&J. Gallo Winery has purchased part of the vacant fruit cannery for wine production purposes.
Seneca on Finch Road in Modesto, Calif. is pictured on Monday October 29, 2018. E.&J. Gallo Winery has purchased part of the vacant fruit cannery for wine production purposes. Joan Barnett Lee jlee@modbee.com

Valley Children’s moving forward with plans for new Merced medical facility

Central Valley Business TImes

October 16, 2018

  • Will be on site of former police headquarters
  • “This is a great addition to the medical landscape”

Valley Children’s Healthcare has entered into negotiations to buy a 4.54-acre parcel in North Merced to create a specialty medical building. The Merced City Council unanimously approved the agreement at its Monday meeting.

The proposed purchase price is $2.1 million. The property is the former police headquarters site on the northwest corner of Yosemite Avenue and Mansionette Drive.

“This is a great addition to the medical landscape,” says Mayor Pro Tem Jill McLeod, a nurse practitioner. “Valley Children’s is a name that parents and doctors have trusted for decades, with caring, knowledgeable staff and excellent service. We are very fortunate to have them expanding their operations in Merced.”

Each year, more than 14,000 children from Merced County are cared for by Valley Children’s team of pediatric specialists. Since 1989, Valley Children’s has provided outpatient support  at Olivewood Specialty Care Center. Today, only 23 percent of outpatient visits are able to be made in Merced. A new pediatric primary and specialty care medical office in the city will expand that figure to 90 percent, the city says.

“As demands for pediatric services in Merced continue to grow, we are committed to keeping as many families as close to home as possible,” says Valley Children’s Healthcare President and CEO Todd Suntrapak. “Our ultimate goal is to have every family throughout the Valley be within 30 minutes or 30 miles from a Valley Children’s pediatric doctor, because that is what is bestfor kids and their families.”

“This ties in well to our existing medical community,” adds Economic Development Director Frank Quintero. “Mercy Medical Center is just blocks away, Golden Valley Health Center will be around the corner and we have other medical facilities nearby.”

Since 1989, Valley Children’s has operated a pediatric specialty care center in the city of Merced and since 1996, it has owned and operated a level II Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Mercy Medical Center. Valley Children’s Healthcare is one of the biggest pediatric healthcare networks in the country, serving more than 1.3 million children in 12 counties throughout Central California and the Central Coast.

The new outpatient center in Merced will offer several pediatric specialties, including pediatric cardiology and pediatric neurology. The first phase of the building would be 15,000 to  20,000 square feet and could grow to 40,000 square feet as demand for pediatric services increases.

It’s expected to have 50 to 60 full-time equivalent employees at build-out with salaries and benefits totaling $4-$5 million. Mr. Quintero says the purchase is just the first step in a long process before the medical center is constructed and opened.

“We will help them move through the planning and permitting process as quickly as possible, but Valley Children’s has several other projects ahead of us, so it will take some time before they have this one shovel-ready.”

The city purchased the property in 2010 with the intention of building the new police headquarters on the site. Construction was put on hold during the Great Recession and subsequently the site was re-evaluated and it was determined that the location wasn’t the best for a police station. The city purchased the Merced Sun-Star property on G Street for the police headquarters and decided to surplus the Yosemite Avenue land.

http://files.constantcontact.com/2cb20f61601/abecb6e8-5a01-407c-bc4d-acc97b11a634.pdf

A new store is taking over two empty Shaw Ave. spots. It’s a familiar name – with a twist

September 27, 2018 08:59 AM

Updated September 27, 2018 11:34 AM

Adventist Health to build new hospital in northwest Bakersfield

Adventist Health will be building a new hospital in Northwest Bakersfield.

Sharlet Briggs, president/CEO of Adventist Health Bakersfield, said the hospital will be built off Coffee Road near Brimhall Road, next to what will become the Bakersfield Commons, a 250-acre mixed-use development that will include retail, residential, recreational and other types of space.

Briggs said the new hospital, which will be the third in Kern County once the new Tehachapi hospital opens, is still in the early stages of planning, with construction work expected to start in 2021 for an opening in 2024.

“At Adventist Health, we’re known for our quality,” she said. “As we look at opening a new site, we take that with us there. We look at how do we take the best, safest care available to our citizens of Bakersfield and Kern County? That’s our responsibility.”

Briggs said hospital employees were notified about the new facility last week and will be having talks with them to get their feedback on the new hospital.

Briggs said Adventist Health is still looking into what kind of specialties the hospital will have and what is most in need.

“We’ll get our employees involved, our physicians involved and the community involved in really defining what this next hospital is going to be,” she said.

Why a new hospital in town? Briggs said the current hospital off of Chester Avenue in downtown Bakersfield has been near or exceeded capacity with the 254 beds it provides for years. She said the hospital has considered a new facility in town for the past several years.

“We keep looking at how can we better serve the community so that next patient who walks into the hospital has a bed ready for them,” she said. “This has been on our radar for a long time, and now we’ve gotten approval to move forward.”

Briggs said the new facility won’t be as large as the downtown hospital. She said Adventist Health will be hiring workers for the hospital but said the exact number of hires has yet to be determined.

https://www.bakersfield.com/news/breaking/adventist-health-to-build-new-hospital-in-northwest-bakersfield/article_b988aa4a-b60a-11e8-8b72-e75817c3886a.html?utm_source=bakersfield.com&utm_campaign=%2Fnewsletters%2Fbreaking%3Ffast-method&utm_medium=email&utm_content=read%20more

‘Upscale’ hotel and conference center could be coming to Oakhurst

The Madera County Board of Supervisors is expected to vote next month on a $20 million project that would bring an upscale hotel and conference center to Oakhurst.

You can get a job at Caltrans in two days. It still has 1,100 openings.

 

 

By Adam Ashton

September 12, 2018 05:15 AM

 

Forget the stereotypes of California state government’s painfully slow process for hiring new workers.

This summer, it was possible to walk into a Caltrans hiring fair and leave with a job offer.

Motivated by a wave of retirements and an urgency to fill new positions created by the state’s gas tax increase, Caltrans devised a bureaucracy-defying human resources program that let it bring on hundreds of new employees at a time during hiring events. Almost 600 people have joined the department through those two-day job fairs.

“It was a very quick turnaround,” said Andy Chou, 29, a new Caltrans structural engineer who went to a hiring fair at Sacramento State in May had a job offer within days. He started work last month. “I was definitely surprised by” the speed of the department’s hiring.

There’s more good news if you know someone looking for a job – Caltrans still has another 1,100 vacancies.

The rush to hire comes mainly from Senate Bill 1, the 10-year gas tax and vehicle fee increases the Legislature adopted in 2017 to fund a decade’s worth of transportation projects.

Voters in November will see a bid to repeal the tax on the ballot which would jeopardize funding. So far, unions, contractors and local governments working to defend SB 1 have raised more than $26 million to defeat the repeal. Groups that want to repeal the tax have raised about $2.5 million.

Caltrans is moving forward as if the repeal initiative would fail, and is filling jobs at a fast clip. The state budget Gov. Jerry Brown signed in June sets Caltrans on track to add 1,150 new positions over the next 11 months, up from 19,109 last year.

“We are making a dent,” said Michelle Tucker, the department’s human resources director. “I’m really pleased with the innovative hiring techniques we’ve done this summer.”

California’s web site for applying for state jobs – jobs.ca.gov – has been redesigned to guide applicants through the hiring process.

It’s racing to add staff in a hot economy in which other engineering firms and local governments also are bulking up.

“They need design staff to deliver state highway projects,” said Ted Toppin, executive director of Professional Engineers in California Government. “That’s what Californians expect. Right now they’re competing with other state and local departments and the private sector for engineers, so the need to on-board them is real or they’re going to lose them.”

Caltrans had a long-approaching retirement wave, especially among its engineering ranks. In 2016, the average age of the state’s civil engineers was 51, and 52 among electrical engineers.

Meanwhile, the Brown administration shrank the headcount at Caltrans over much of the past decade. The department had 10,143 employees in the division that plans road projects in 2013. That number shrank to about 7,000 two years ago. It’s expected to grow again to 8,700 by next year.

“The department did not hire engineers and related staff for over 10 years,” Toppin said. “From 2007 to 2017 they sort of shed 3,500 positions,” he said. “Year after year, it was no replacement of folks who retired, so they’re an older workforce.”

PECG’s three-year contract that expired in July also did not give engineers a reason to stay. Brown did not commit to a raise this year when his administration negotiated the contract with the union in 2015.

Between July 2017 and July 2018, 922 Caltrans employees retired.

PECG’s new contract includes some incentives that would keep longtime engineers in the workforce developing projects funded by the gas tax increase, including an immediate 4.5 percent raise and an escalating seniority differential that rises to an extra 5.5 percent for engineers with 23 years of experience at Caltrans by 2021.

Caltrans crafted four rapid-hiring events it held this year with the state human resources department. They allowed people to apply for jobs in person, be interviewed by panels of managers, have their qualifications reviewed and references checked within two days. If they passed, they’d walk out with a conditional job offer.

“We’re able to do hundreds of interviews in a day,” Tucker said.

Usually, landing a state job takes much longer. The only other state departments that regularly use rapid-hiring events are the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and the Prison Industry Authority, Cal HR spokesman Andrew LaMar said.

Jeff Wiley, Caltrans’ assistant division chief for project management, said the department has been attracting engineers with a range of experience, from new graduates to veterans from other states.

The department and PECG negotiated a compromise to get more experienced engineers working on projects as soon as possible. The agreement lets Caltrans slightly increase the amount of work it sends to private contractors, although the department has not yet exceeded its traditional outsourcing cap.

“We’ve got some plans out for making those goals,” Wiley said.

Toppin said the agreement was reasonable considering the department’s “sudden increase in revenue” and shortage of experienced engineering staff.

 

Read more here: https://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/the-state-worker/article218170925.html#storylink=cpy