Progress seen in effort to start medical school in Valley

 

  • Legislation clears one hurdle
  • “Today marks a renewed effort to undertake the construction of major new medical infrastructure projects in the Valley”

A proposal to fund creation of a San Joaquin Valley medical school has passed its first committee vote in the state Legislature with unanimous bipartisan support, says the bill’s author, Assemblyman Adam Gray, D-Merced.

Mr. Gray also points to a University of California report that highlights the health care shortages in the San Joaquin Valley and suggests a path towards the establishment of more robust medical infrastructure in the Valley, including the establishment of a fully independent medical school at the University of  California, Merced. The report was funded by a budget item Mr. Gray secured in 2015.

“Today marks a renewed effort to undertake the construction of major new medical infrastructure projects in the Valley,” says Mr. Gray. “The UC’s report highlights the compelling access to care failures that families in the Valley know all too well. We simply are not providing adequate health care for one of the fastest growing, poorest, and least healthy regions of the state.”

His bill, AB 2202, appropriates a currently unspecified sum of money to the UC Regents for the construction of a branch campus of the UCSF School of Medicine in partnership with UC Merced and the UCSF Fresno Medical Education Program.

“The establishment of a branch campus is a near-term solution that is a proven pathway to opening a fully accredited medical school,” says Mr. Gray. “In this bill, we have taken the lessons learned from medical schools in other regions and applied what we have learned for the Valley.”

The University of California report details the numerous health challenges faced by the residents of the San Joaquin Valley and provides a number of recommendations to improve access to care. The report highlights the importance of leveraging existing infrastructure at the UCSF Fresno Medical Center to provide new access to care options like telehealth and residency expansion while recommending the establishment of a branch campus as the most proven track to a fully independent medical school.

“This report gives us a road map to follow,” says Mr. Gray. “We will highlight these recommendations at a health summit at UC Merced with Chancellor Leland and President Napolitano in early summer and continue the hard work necessary to ultimately establish a school of medicine at UC Merced.”

http://files.constantcontact.com/2cb20f61601/2acc4d6b-12cc-448d-add4-9e1c6f3451dd.pdf

Clovis Community Medical Center to add beds, expand services

 

  • Expansion planned over next four years
  • To cost $390 Million

Community Medical Centers’ Board of Trustees today approved a four-year construction project that will add 144 private beds and expand several services at Clovis Community Medical Center in the Central Valley city of Clovis.

The $390 million, 190,000-square-foot expansion project will feature a five-story bed tower and will add 15,000 square feet to the hospital’s emergency room, create six additional operating rooms, 24 additional ICU beds, and expand the hospital’s radiology, pharmacy and laboratory services along with the kitchen and dining areas.

The project also will include an additional parking structure and a two-story, 60,000-square-foot clinical and administrative support building.

When the project is completed in 2022, Clovis Community will have 352 all-private inpatient beds while providing jobs for an additional 420 nurses, therapists, technicians and support staff.

“We need to significantly expand inpatient capacity in our hospital system, and this Clovis project is the quickest and most cost-effective way to do it,” says Tim Joslin, Community’s president and CEO.

Site work will begin next month, and Community anticipates the expansion project to employ some 2,500 construction workers, the overwhelming majority of them local.

Funding for the expansion will come from Community’s operations and from donations.

http://files.constantcontact.com/2cb20f61601/50ddefe4-7c4a-4dc4-b5a1-e0c3ce2a241c.pdf

2.06 acres purchased across from Stockton Kaiser; Outpatient clinic to occupy space

By Marc Lutz

 

This artist’s rendering shows the planned outpatient clinic to be built at 7500 W. March Lane in Stockton.

STOCKTON—A 2.06-acre property on West Lane across from the Kaiser Permanente campus was recently purchased for $1.25 million. It will be the home to a new outpatient clinic.

An existing building, occupying 7,500 square feet of the acreage, will be demolished, and the purchaser, San Ramon-based Meridian, will build a 13,600-square-foot outpatient clinic on the site.

“This location is perfect for our client who has experienced a strong demand for its services in this area,” said Lorenzo Brooks, Meridian’s director of Acquisitions, in statement. “We persevered for over 15 months to bring this deal to a close because of our confidence that this would be an ideal location to serve patients in the community.”

The property was purchased by The Builder’s Exchange of Stockton, who was represented by CBRE.

The facility is expected to be under construction in a few months, taking less than a year to complete, according to Brooks.

“We’re extremely proud of this acquisition as it shows our ability to unlock valuable real estate near major healthcare system hubs,” Brooks continued. “This deal marks the sixteenth outpatient clinic that we have developed in the last five years and we continue to solidify ourselves as experts in healthcare development.”

Meridian is also planning to build facilities in Modesto and Long Beach in the coming months, as well. The builds are part of Meridian’s pursuit of healthcare facility development throughout the western U.S.

https://cvbj.biz/2018/03/26/2-06-acres-purchased-across-from-stockton-kaiser-outpatient-clinic-to-occupy-space/