Category: Health/Medical

Valley Children’s moving forward with plans for new Merced medical facility

Central Valley Business TImes

October 16, 2018

  • Will be on site of former police headquarters
  • “This is a great addition to the medical landscape”

Valley Children’s Healthcare has entered into negotiations to buy a 4.54-acre parcel in North Merced to create a specialty medical building. The Merced City Council unanimously approved the agreement at its Monday meeting.

The proposed purchase price is $2.1 million. The property is the former police headquarters site on the northwest corner of Yosemite Avenue and Mansionette Drive.

“This is a great addition to the medical landscape,” says Mayor Pro Tem Jill McLeod, a nurse practitioner. “Valley Children’s is a name that parents and doctors have trusted for decades, with caring, knowledgeable staff and excellent service. We are very fortunate to have them expanding their operations in Merced.”

Each year, more than 14,000 children from Merced County are cared for by Valley Children’s team of pediatric specialists. Since 1989, Valley Children’s has provided outpatient support  at Olivewood Specialty Care Center. Today, only 23 percent of outpatient visits are able to be made in Merced. A new pediatric primary and specialty care medical office in the city will expand that figure to 90 percent, the city says.

“As demands for pediatric services in Merced continue to grow, we are committed to keeping as many families as close to home as possible,” says Valley Children’s Healthcare President and CEO Todd Suntrapak. “Our ultimate goal is to have every family throughout the Valley be within 30 minutes or 30 miles from a Valley Children’s pediatric doctor, because that is what is bestfor kids and their families.”

“This ties in well to our existing medical community,” adds Economic Development Director Frank Quintero. “Mercy Medical Center is just blocks away, Golden Valley Health Center will be around the corner and we have other medical facilities nearby.”

Since 1989, Valley Children’s has operated a pediatric specialty care center in the city of Merced and since 1996, it has owned and operated a level II Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Mercy Medical Center. Valley Children’s Healthcare is one of the biggest pediatric healthcare networks in the country, serving more than 1.3 million children in 12 counties throughout Central California and the Central Coast.

The new outpatient center in Merced will offer several pediatric specialties, including pediatric cardiology and pediatric neurology. The first phase of the building would be 15,000 to  20,000 square feet and could grow to 40,000 square feet as demand for pediatric services increases.

It’s expected to have 50 to 60 full-time equivalent employees at build-out with salaries and benefits totaling $4-$5 million. Mr. Quintero says the purchase is just the first step in a long process before the medical center is constructed and opened.

“We will help them move through the planning and permitting process as quickly as possible, but Valley Children’s has several other projects ahead of us, so it will take some time before they have this one shovel-ready.”

The city purchased the property in 2010 with the intention of building the new police headquarters on the site. Construction was put on hold during the Great Recession and subsequently the site was re-evaluated and it was determined that the location wasn’t the best for a police station. The city purchased the Merced Sun-Star property on G Street for the police headquarters and decided to surplus the Yosemite Avenue land.

http://files.constantcontact.com/2cb20f61601/abecb6e8-5a01-407c-bc4d-acc97b11a634.pdf

Adventist Health to build new hospital in northwest Bakersfield

Adventist Health will be building a new hospital in Northwest Bakersfield.

Sharlet Briggs, president/CEO of Adventist Health Bakersfield, said the hospital will be built off Coffee Road near Brimhall Road, next to what will become the Bakersfield Commons, a 250-acre mixed-use development that will include retail, residential, recreational and other types of space.

Briggs said the new hospital, which will be the third in Kern County once the new Tehachapi hospital opens, is still in the early stages of planning, with construction work expected to start in 2021 for an opening in 2024.

“At Adventist Health, we’re known for our quality,” she said. “As we look at opening a new site, we take that with us there. We look at how do we take the best, safest care available to our citizens of Bakersfield and Kern County? That’s our responsibility.”

Briggs said hospital employees were notified about the new facility last week and will be having talks with them to get their feedback on the new hospital.

Briggs said Adventist Health is still looking into what kind of specialties the hospital will have and what is most in need.

“We’ll get our employees involved, our physicians involved and the community involved in really defining what this next hospital is going to be,” she said.

Why a new hospital in town? Briggs said the current hospital off of Chester Avenue in downtown Bakersfield has been near or exceeded capacity with the 254 beds it provides for years. She said the hospital has considered a new facility in town for the past several years.

“We keep looking at how can we better serve the community so that next patient who walks into the hospital has a bed ready for them,” she said. “This has been on our radar for a long time, and now we’ve gotten approval to move forward.”

Briggs said the new facility won’t be as large as the downtown hospital. She said Adventist Health will be hiring workers for the hospital but said the exact number of hires has yet to be determined.

https://www.bakersfield.com/news/breaking/adventist-health-to-build-new-hospital-in-northwest-bakersfield/article_b988aa4a-b60a-11e8-8b72-e75817c3886a.html?utm_source=bakersfield.com&utm_campaign=%2Fnewsletters%2Fbreaking%3Ffast-method&utm_medium=email&utm_content=read%20more

VOLT Institute Graduates Inaugural Class

MODESTO, CA — On June 27, nearly a year after opening, VOLT Institute saw the graduation of its

first class of maintenance mechanic students. VOLT Institute, a partnership of Opportunity Stanislaus

and Stanislaus County Office of Education, was started at the request of local employers looking for

skilled candidates to fill existing and future vacancies. Employers set a priority of training maintenance

mechanics, a field with widespread shortages including over 300 openings in Stanislaus County alone.

Austin Parker, 22, is one of the graduates. He credits the program with his new job at Hughson Nut,

citing the teachers, hands-on learning, and personalized pace as benefits.

 

“VOLT was a greatopportunity,” said Parker. “It has already opened up a ton of doors for me. The instruction at VOLT

was hands-on and kept pace with students and the job placement assistance was beyond what any other

college would do. Thanks to VOLT I no longer just have a job- I have a career.”

 

Parker’s situation is not unique. In fact, VOLT boasts an 88% placement rate among graduates.

Opportunity Stanislaus CEO David White has been a driver of VOLT since the planning stages. “We

have come so far so fast and are excited about the momentum we’re gaining,” said White. “We have

the best equipment—machines that simulate industry facilities—and we have a team that is absolutely

committed to the success of the students. We look forward to great things.”

 

In addition to the 11-month Industrial Maintenance Mechanic program, VOLT also has a 3-month

Certified Production Technician program and workshops on a wide variety of business topics. Training

areas will continue to expand as the student population and capacity grows. “Stanislaus County Office

of Education has a tradition of preparing students for the workforce through education,” said Executive

Director Deb Rowe.

“VOLT is a great example of multi-sector partnership training, the industry

recognized certifications through VOLT qualify student for a living wage job which affirms we are

headed in the right direction to support our community and beyond.”

 

VOLT Institute recently made news when it was awarded $1,000,000 in the 2018-19 California State

Budget to expand training for high-demand careers in manufacturing, one of the county’s most critical

industries. The funding will support the expansion of an education and training partnership between

Modesto Junior College (MJC), Stanislaus County Office of Education (SCOE), and Opportunity

Stanislaus to prepare students for jobs based on employer demand. The grant will serve as the local

match necessary for a federal United States Department of Commerce, Economic Development

Administration grant.

 

New classes start October 8 and continue through September 5 of 2019. For more information or to

enroll please visit www.voltinstitute.com or call 209.566.9102.

Cannabis operation holds groundbreaking in Mendota

Inside an old packing shed on the outskirts of Mendota, a new cannabis operation is moving in, hoping to revitalize the space and the town’s economy.

“While so many have doubted us, I knew we could pull this off,” said Tim McGraw, the CEO of Canna-Hub.

Allowing this massive commercial marijuana business to move in wasn’t easy. It took months of city council meetings and convincing skeptical families.

On Thursday, Canna-Hub finally broke ground on the 16-acre property.

“You got to take some chances in this world, and that’s what the city of Mendota did,” said Mendota city councilmember Robert Silva.

The company itself won’t be growing marijuana. It’s leasing out nine spaces for operators to manufacture or distribute. Tenants can do anything, except for selling marijuana and operating outdoor grows.

“We are about a third already committed, leased out. Pretty good pipeline of very good operators to take the rest of the space,” said Jonathan Charak with Canna-Hub.

The company has promised to generate about 100 jobs. The operation will also bring in about $800,000 to Mendota per year.

“Our general fund is a little above $6 million right now, so $800,000 is a great 17 percent, 18 percent increase, which is a big deal. When it comes to public safety you can never have too much,” said Matt Flood, the Economic Development manager of Mendota.

The money is expected to roll in right away. Canna-Hub expects operators to move into the facility in the next 90 days.

Valley Children’s trauma center gets positive review

 

  • Now verified as a Level II Pediatric Trauma Center by the American College of Surgeons
  • “This verification is important to our Trauma Center”

Valley Children’s Hospital in Madera has been verified as a Lever II Pediatric Trauma Center by the American College of Surgeons. It is the only pediatric trauma center in the region.

“This verification is important to our Trauma Center, as the ACS recognizes Valley Children’s – from our surgeons and nurses to our therapists and trauma coordinators – for providing exceptional pediatric trauma care as quickly as possible, from  start to finish, for children involved in car crashes, falls, accidents, acts of violence and other trauma,” says Valley Children’s Healthcare President and CEO Todd Suntrapak.

“Trauma center levels across the United States are identified in two fashions: a designation process and a verification process,” explains the American Trauma Society. “The different levels (ie. Level I, II, III, IV or V) refer to the kinds of resources available in a trauma center and the number of patients admitted yearly.”

Earlier this year, representatives with the ACS’s Verification Review Committee visited the hospital. They assessed commitment, readiness, resources, policies, patient care and performance improvement among other requirements. Verified trauma centers must meet essential criteria that ensure capability and institutional performance as outlined by the ACS.

“Injury is the leading cause of death and acquired disability for children, and providing expert trauma care across the continuum – from injury prevention to pediatric rehabilitation  and family restoration – is at the core of our mission,” says Michael Allshouse, medical director of Valley Children’s pediatric trauma program and pediatric surgery.

This verification by the ACS comes two years after the Central California Emergency Medical Services Agency designated Valley Children’s Hospital as a Level II Pediatric Trauma Center, the only such center between the Bay Area and Los Angeles.

With that designation, critically injured children could be transported directly from the field to Valley Children’s Hospital, ensuring they receive expert pediatric care even sooner than before.

http://files.constantcontact.com/2cb20f61601/657d8ae5-816b-4323-a6b3-bc71dec52253.pdf

 

Progress seen in effort to start medical school in Valley

 

  • Legislation clears one hurdle
  • “Today marks a renewed effort to undertake the construction of major new medical infrastructure projects in the Valley”

A proposal to fund creation of a San Joaquin Valley medical school has passed its first committee vote in the state Legislature with unanimous bipartisan support, says the bill’s author, Assemblyman Adam Gray, D-Merced.

Mr. Gray also points to a University of California report that highlights the health care shortages in the San Joaquin Valley and suggests a path towards the establishment of more robust medical infrastructure in the Valley, including the establishment of a fully independent medical school at the University of  California, Merced. The report was funded by a budget item Mr. Gray secured in 2015.

“Today marks a renewed effort to undertake the construction of major new medical infrastructure projects in the Valley,” says Mr. Gray. “The UC’s report highlights the compelling access to care failures that families in the Valley know all too well. We simply are not providing adequate health care for one of the fastest growing, poorest, and least healthy regions of the state.”

His bill, AB 2202, appropriates a currently unspecified sum of money to the UC Regents for the construction of a branch campus of the UCSF School of Medicine in partnership with UC Merced and the UCSF Fresno Medical Education Program.

“The establishment of a branch campus is a near-term solution that is a proven pathway to opening a fully accredited medical school,” says Mr. Gray. “In this bill, we have taken the lessons learned from medical schools in other regions and applied what we have learned for the Valley.”

The University of California report details the numerous health challenges faced by the residents of the San Joaquin Valley and provides a number of recommendations to improve access to care. The report highlights the importance of leveraging existing infrastructure at the UCSF Fresno Medical Center to provide new access to care options like telehealth and residency expansion while recommending the establishment of a branch campus as the most proven track to a fully independent medical school.

“This report gives us a road map to follow,” says Mr. Gray. “We will highlight these recommendations at a health summit at UC Merced with Chancellor Leland and President Napolitano in early summer and continue the hard work necessary to ultimately establish a school of medicine at UC Merced.”

http://files.constantcontact.com/2cb20f61601/2acc4d6b-12cc-448d-add4-9e1c6f3451dd.pdf

Clovis Community Medical Center to add beds, expand services

 

  • Expansion planned over next four years
  • To cost $390 Million

Community Medical Centers’ Board of Trustees today approved a four-year construction project that will add 144 private beds and expand several services at Clovis Community Medical Center in the Central Valley city of Clovis.

The $390 million, 190,000-square-foot expansion project will feature a five-story bed tower and will add 15,000 square feet to the hospital’s emergency room, create six additional operating rooms, 24 additional ICU beds, and expand the hospital’s radiology, pharmacy and laboratory services along with the kitchen and dining areas.

The project also will include an additional parking structure and a two-story, 60,000-square-foot clinical and administrative support building.

When the project is completed in 2022, Clovis Community will have 352 all-private inpatient beds while providing jobs for an additional 420 nurses, therapists, technicians and support staff.

“We need to significantly expand inpatient capacity in our hospital system, and this Clovis project is the quickest and most cost-effective way to do it,” says Tim Joslin, Community’s president and CEO.

Site work will begin next month, and Community anticipates the expansion project to employ some 2,500 construction workers, the overwhelming majority of them local.

Funding for the expansion will come from Community’s operations and from donations.

http://files.constantcontact.com/2cb20f61601/50ddefe4-7c4a-4dc4-b5a1-e0c3ce2a241c.pdf

2.06 acres purchased across from Stockton Kaiser; Outpatient clinic to occupy space

By Marc Lutz

 

This artist’s rendering shows the planned outpatient clinic to be built at 7500 W. March Lane in Stockton.

STOCKTON—A 2.06-acre property on West Lane across from the Kaiser Permanente campus was recently purchased for $1.25 million. It will be the home to a new outpatient clinic.

An existing building, occupying 7,500 square feet of the acreage, will be demolished, and the purchaser, San Ramon-based Meridian, will build a 13,600-square-foot outpatient clinic on the site.

“This location is perfect for our client who has experienced a strong demand for its services in this area,” said Lorenzo Brooks, Meridian’s director of Acquisitions, in statement. “We persevered for over 15 months to bring this deal to a close because of our confidence that this would be an ideal location to serve patients in the community.”

The property was purchased by The Builder’s Exchange of Stockton, who was represented by CBRE.

The facility is expected to be under construction in a few months, taking less than a year to complete, according to Brooks.

“We’re extremely proud of this acquisition as it shows our ability to unlock valuable real estate near major healthcare system hubs,” Brooks continued. “This deal marks the sixteenth outpatient clinic that we have developed in the last five years and we continue to solidify ourselves as experts in healthcare development.”

Meridian is also planning to build facilities in Modesto and Long Beach in the coming months, as well. The builds are part of Meridian’s pursuit of healthcare facility development throughout the western U.S.

https://cvbj.biz/2018/03/26/2-06-acres-purchased-across-from-stockton-kaiser-outpatient-clinic-to-occupy-space/